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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings. I have a question. I am looking at getting a Road Star 1700 of about 2004 to 2007. I'm trying to do as much research as possible to make sure that certain critical jobs have been done, or will have to be done by me.

What are the most important jobs that should be done on a Road Star that has about 75,000 Km or about 46,000 Mi. I know I see on Harley's, depending on age and engine, they have to change cam chain tensioners because they get worn, timing chains, shim bearing, and little pieces of metal that float to act as a bearing functionally, even though its not a true bearing. Various stock bearings should be moved to Timken bearings if the engine is opened up already, and important other components.

But what are the most critical components to have done on a Road Star by those miles, should some of them be done once? twice? three times a lady?

I'm wondering especially if any electrical components that wear out, such as the starter coils, the igniter box or other electronics that can fail when you don't have a spare, because you didn't think of it to bring replacement on a cross country trip. Or, don't bring a long because they're $200 a pair, just for safety. Are there any chains, belts, gears, cables, gaskets, or any such gasket compounds, or locktite, white grease, Break Fluid, for filling or for cleaning that can leave you dead in the Death Valley.

I plan. I have to. I've been Murphied more than a few times in my life and I think I've had just about enough of the wrong things happening, I'm making sure that I have some McGyver spares with me. Wires, electrical tape, duct tape, gorilla glue, gorilla tape.

I'm not packing a spare tyre with me when a worm and glue should save most holes, but, I would like to be mobile enough to get to somewhere with a bike shop and some better expertise than the rider, AKA ~~ Me.

I'm starting a list, tools, sizes, ratchets, glues, gums, rubbers, o-rings of many sizes, greases, oils, WD-40, Break fluid, ethanol-free petrol, windex, as much as I can get to fill a saddle bag for safety. The other bag is for me.

Any ideas and/or stories about some failure that could have gotten you back on the road if you only had that $20 part, that $5 part, a teeny tiny Philips screwdriver, duct tape.

Only once I have my bike all serviced up will I feel safe travelling so far, through area's that I don't know, and if something happens, hopefully I'll be prepared Boy Scout style to get right back on the road.

Road flares, flash lights, and tools are a given. a handful of bulbs, front and back.

I just want to make sure that I have covered about 95% of the most likely causes of road side breakdowns. That 5% you won't know what hit you anyway, because, as any traveller will tell you, no matter how much you plan and pack, there will always be that one something that will go that you just didn't think about

Thank you in advance for all for your help and input.
Kind Regards
Cultosaurus
 

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Harleys do not have cam chains. Either do the 1700 roadstars.
Just make sure tires are good, nuts and bolts are tight, tuned up and ride it.
Maybe carry a basic tool kit. No sense in packing extra stuff you will never need because the 1700 is a pretty solid bike.
 

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Yeah, I have a MUST HAVE item. And after you get it, email it to yourself. You will always have access to it even on someone else's phone/computer.

 

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I agree with road_slug as these are solid bikes. I’ve not had lengthy experience with my RoadStar as I bought it later last year, but they are pretty basic. I carry a basic tool kit and a tire kit when I’m out riding. If you don’t have a repair manual, I highly suggest you get one, it’ll be really helpful in the future.


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Harleys do not have cam chains. Either do the 1700 roadstars.
Just make sure tires are good, nuts and bolts are tight, tuned up and ride it.
Maybe carry a basic tool kit. No sense in packing extra stuff you will never need because the 1700 is a pretty solid bike.
I have replaced cam chain's on tc88 motors. I believe S&S Owns the patent on the gears that replace the chain, I could be wrong on that, but they were the first to offer the gears.
 

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The Harley cam chain issue is only common to the twin cam engine, it's not the best design but is an easy fix.
As far as Roadstars go they are incredibly durable, there were some issues with the trans and oil pump drive on early models.
The clutch spring arrangement could be better but the Barnett pressure plate kit will cure that.

I have a '99 model with a little over 80K on it, has been one of the most reliable bikes l have owned.
Maintenance costs are low, insurance is cheap,
Very economical bike to operate.

I carry basic tools, bulbs and tire repair stuff.
Have used the tool kit to help other riders more than I've needed it myself

Service manual is one of the best investments you can make.
 

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I have replaced cam chain's on tc88 motors. I believe S&S Owns the patent on the gears that replace the chain, I could be wrong on that, but they were the first to offer the gears.
That's right. You are correct.forgot about that.
My 96 also has twin counterbalancers connected by a chain also.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I want to thank you all for your suggestions. Tools are a definite. I have loads, I've always worked on my cars, but I just don't have a full set of metrics yet. I have a PDF copy of the 1700 owners manual, and a PDF of the 1600 service manual. I'll be putting both of those onto a tablet that I'll be taking with me on long haul trips. I could never find a 1700 service manual online, but as far as I can tell, the only difference is the size of the jugs, all the rest of it should still apply to the 1700.

The reason that I had to ask is that most of the bikes I'm finding around here are in the 60 K to 80 K region, but the only one that's in my neighbourhood to buy has over 100 K on it. I just didn't want any surprises. The reputation and reliability of the Road Star is the reason why I've chosen it.

I've just been off two wheels for a couple of decades now, and decided that riding a bike is a much better way to go than a rust bucket. . . which pretty much describes my budget for this. At least with a bike, I won't have holes in the trunk, bearings shot on the steering and all the usual cage problems. That's why I wanted to make sure that I cover all my bases as far as my bike is concerned. I've searched and haven't really found major problems popping up, but I had to be sure, so . . I had to ask the professionals . .. the riders.

Thanks again guys !!!! . .. I really appreciate your advice.
 

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You will find that unless they are abused badly, Yamaha will easily go over 100k / 140k miles without major problems. The only thing you have to do is normal maint. and tires.
 

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As everyone has already stated, these are pretty good bikes not needing much outside of general maintenance. Just make sure to use a good V-Twin type motorcycle oil. If I were going to carry any extra part outside of a bulb or fuse it would be a clutch cable. Normally you'd probably notice a cable starting to fray. But it's something that takes little room to carry but could leave you stranded if it broke.
 

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When we travel I carry a tablet with service manuals and 2 tools I can't guarantee every shop will have . The Stratoliner needs a 19mm allen for the front axle and a 27mm socket for the back axle. In my 51 years of working on motorcycles I have never needed either till this bike, so I don't know in an emergency if where I stop will have them , so I have them. I also carry a multimeter, with so much relying on minimum voltages I want a way to check them.
You will need to see what you feel on the road you will need, it has changed for me over the years depending the bike I was riding and who I was riding with. It will also depend on your abilities and what you feel you can do on the road and what you would want to do on the road.
 

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Jspree: that was an AWESOME answer, sir! Not sarcastic, serious.

Not only an example, but a CONCEPT. Yeah, I have had vehicles with odd tools to do common repairs. And I got them. But (honestly!) It never really occurred to me to apply that to all my vehicles.

NICE. We need a "Pat on the back" / gold star to put on posts like that.
 

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I had the front pulley sprocket (the drive pulley to the rear wheel) come loose a few years ago on my 2006 RoadStar at about 25,000 miles. I;m second owner so I don't know the history of the bike or if it had been apart before. Fortunately it came loose across the road from an Ace hardware that had a socket that would fit the nut so I was able to tighten it up on the side of the road. Seems like it was 30mm socket.

I really like the 2006 because it's carbureted and you need a little fiddling with the choke until it's warmed up. The bike sounds awesome and will run on the highway all day at any speed. A Mustang seat is a must. Also watch the tires. My rear tire was getting worn but I though it had one more weekend in it. Boy was I wrong. It went down after about 400 miles. Again, lucky that we were on a back road and going slow and I had a place to pull over. It cost $600 to have it trailered about 150 miles back to our base. The michelin tires I changed to are night and day better. The bike handles so much easier on these tires.
 

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I had the front pulley sprocket (the drive pulley to the rear wheel) come loose a few years ago on my 2006 RoadStar at about 25,000 miles. I;m second owner so I don't know the history of the bike or if it had been apart before. Fortunately it came loose across the road from an Ace hardware that had a socket that would fit the nut so I was able to tighten it up on the side of the road. Seems like it was 30mm socket.

I really like the 2006 because it's carbureted and you need a little fiddling with the choke until it's warmed up. The bike sounds awesome and will run on the highway all day at any speed. A Mustang seat is a must. Also watch the tires. My rear tire was getting worn but I though it had one more weekend in it. Boy was I wrong. It went down after about 400 miles. Again, lucky that we were on a back road and going slow and I had a place to pull over. It cost $600 to have it trailered about 150 miles back to our base. The michelin tires I changed to are night and day better. The bike handles so much easier on these tires.
oh, that rear tire had less than 8,000 miles on it.
 

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Harleys do not have cam chains. Either do the 1700 roadstars.
Just make sure tires are good, nuts and bolts are tight, tuned up and ride it.
Maybe carry a basic tool kit. No sense in packing extra stuff you will never need because the 1700 is a pretty solid bike.
Harley's have cam chains even the new M8 cam is chain driven.
 

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Jspree: that was an AWESOME answer, sir! Not sarcastic, serious.

Not only an example, but a CONCEPT. Yeah, I have had vehicles with odd tools to do common repairs. And I got them. But (honestly!) It never really occurred to me to apply that to all my vehicles.

NICE. We need a "Pat on the back" / gold star to put on posts like that.
My old Triumph was all Wentworth bolts. Tools were hard to find around here.
 

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I have been following these types of posts all the questions about the one with 4 thousand miles on it I have get answered. I think they are great bikes I should have looked at them sooner. I could have saved myself alot of wrenching on the HD.
 
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