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Hi, I have a new Vstar 950. In the manual, it has some recommended shift points. I tried those shift points but the mph's seem kind of low. My bike felt like it was lagging with what they recommend. What shift points would you all recommend. I have 450 miles on it.
 

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I believe the manufacturer recommended shift points are the earliest shift points. Just wait a few mph. more before shifting if you don't like the recommended shift points.
 

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I agree with kamana. I find the early shifting as suggested in my 1100 manual also provide the best gas mileage. I've gotten up to 51 mpg.
 

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just listen to the bike. 450 miles is enough experience to know when the bike is telling you it needs the next gear. you shouldn't be looking down at your speedometer anymore during shifting. i agree that the manual is a bit conservative, and when i'm accelerating up to 5th gear pretty quickly such as entering a highway, i'm at almost 40mph when i shift to 4th gear and almost 50mph when i shift to 5th. if i'm accelerating more slowly, then my shift points come earlier. i mostly pay attention to when i can feel my engine shake just a tad more to tell me that's when it's time to shift.
 

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Hrm, thats weird cause I'm shifting almost 10 mph after you. My fifth usually occurs around 60 mph, 4th at 50... and on and on. I've been driving manuals (trucks and dirtbikes) for a while and I just wait until I hit the "plateau" in my mind. Its when you've really lost the initial power that a little lower rpms were adding and it seems to almost flatten out. Though, my way is definitely not the best for gas mileage... I tried the recommended and I don't like the sound of the engine bogging slightly, I'd rather burn a little more fuel than hurt my engine by making it have to push harder.
 

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I too rely on the sound of my engine. My shifting definitely differs when I'm just putzing around town to when I'm entering the freeway. I can't really tell you in mph when I shift because I don't look, but you can definitely hear the engine "peak" so to speak. I never really followed manual mainly because their points felt like they were dragging the bike instead of pushing it. A few more mph on the speedo like Kamana said and you should be good.
 

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well,,,,,,,, i guess i run mine harder than most then. i too listen to then engine when i shift. shift when the engine tells you not the speedometer. Or just do like i do and "run it like you stole it" he he he just dont outride yourself. happy riding.
 

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I've noticed, since I posted, that I don't wait as long as I originally thought. I don't shift where recommended, but I don't wait to the very last moment. I noticed the other day that getting into 5th while on the freeway, I shift at about 40-43 mph.

I believe that this is a totally "personal belief" topic in the sense that everyone will most likely have a different opinion on who, what, where, when, and why.
 

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I looked today, and entering the freeway or trying to go fast I shift into 5th about 50-55mph. This bike peaks in torque about 3k so short shifting seems ok on this bike compared to those rpm happy sport bikes, I think the rpms at 70mph are around 5k, bigger cruisers are a bunch lower, like 3-3.5 k. Wish it had another gear, catch myself trying to shift going highway speeds, like an overdrive,lol. Had her up to 105 the other day, seemed like she had more in her, it was very enough for me. Also the vibration from this twin, mostly on the floorboards gets quite noticeable about 70-75 true speed, these bikes are about 4-6 mph low, I drive my car about 74mph, on the bike speedo reading 74, your going about 68, verified from 2 different gps units.
 

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don't you do more damage to your engine with the higher RPMs?
Its a toss up, actually. From what I've come to believe you're putting more strain on your engine at High RPMs, but at low RPMs you're putting more strain on everything past the engine having to do with moving the back tire... I know this is important on 4 wheels, but I'm not sure if it matters much on bikes. I still see it being a problem as anything that would move from just past the engine to the back tire would have to strain a little because its being given way less power than it is supposed to.

I'm really bad at explaining things... maybe someone else knows what I'm talking about?
 

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After the break in period, as long as you aren't hitting the rpm limiter constantly and doing dumb stuff like downshifting way too soon,which does more damage because the engine can spin higher than the limiter would allow, revving up shouldn't cause any problems. Shifting too early can cause carbon buildup and poor performance. Its not rocket science, if when you shift and the bike shakes and lacks power, you shifted to soon.
 
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