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2007 Yamaha V Star 650 custom, 2007 HondaVTX 1300R
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I got used to it when my V Star 650 was my only bike but now that I have another, the long clutch release before engaging 1st gear is really annoying. Is there a fix for this or is it just a characteristic of the V Star 650? Also is needing to go into 4th gear by the time you hit 30 mph normal?
 

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2015 V Star 950, 2013 Suzuki S40
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393 Posts
I have a 950, and the friction zone is ridiculously short, there is like 1/2" of clutch lever movement in the friction zone which makes it very difficult to finesse.
 

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V Star 650 Silverado
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7 Posts
There are fixes for this. One is a modification to the clutch lever and the other is a spring kit that goes on the engine end of the clutch cable. I don't have the specifics but I found them through the forums. I did the spring kit and it works great. It allows you to set the friction zone where you want it and the spring compensates for the slack in the clutch cable.
And yes the long throw is a normal characteristic of the Vstar 650s.
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1982 XV1100,1989 XT600Z Tenere, 2008 F800ST
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The spring kit - made my own for a dollar - is a far better solution than the clutch lever fix. Just getting the engagement point closer to the hand makes it easier to modulate.
 

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The spring mod Is found in the link in this attached post. Second post shows pic of mod on my 650.

 

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2006 Yamaha 650 V Star Classic Cruiser.
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152 Posts
The spring kit - made my own for a dollar - is a far better solution than the clutch lever fix. Just getting the engagement point closer to the hand makes it easier to modulate.
I am pretty sure that the coil spring that is on the rear brake rod of the V Star 650 will fit where the spring goes over the clutch cable. It will hold the clutch lever from flapping about. You could use the dimensions of the brake rod spring to buy another one for the clutch cable fix.
 

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Premium Member
2006 Yamaha 650 V Star Classic Cruiser.
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152 Posts
There are fixes for this. One is a modification to the clutch lever and the other is a spring kit that goes on the engine end of the clutch cable. I don't have the specifics but I found them through the forums. I did the spring kit and it works great. It allows you to set the friction zone where you want it and the spring compensates for the slack in the clutch cable.
And yes the long throw is a normal characteristic of the Vstar 650s. View attachment 117539 View attachment 117539
I found that I did not need the shiny metal tube. If you scroll up you will see a picture of my motorcycle with this spring, minus, the tube. I think that it looks a lot neater without the tube and works just as good.
 

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2006 V star 650
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16 Posts
Technically, it's not a long clutch release, it a quick clutch release, the idea that they built in was that you don't have to grab a fist full of clutch every time you change gears which can be tiring and excessive, just a tweak of the hand to shift, it's also easier for friction zone work because the hand is more sensitive to motion when it's further out than it is cramped up if full grab. I thinks it's a great set up, just try getting used to it is the best long term option.
 

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2006 Yamaha 650 V Star Classic Cruiser.
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152 Posts
Technically, it's not a long clutch release, it a quick clutch release, the idea that they built in was that you don't have to grab a fist full of clutch every time you change gears which can be tiring and excessive, just a tweak of the hand to shift, it's also easier for friction zone work because the hand is more sensitive to motion when it's further out than it is cramped up if full grab. I thinks it's a great set up, just try getting used to it is the best long term option.
It is NOT easy for most people to use the clutch lever that is why lots of people are writing to forums to find if any body has solved the problem. We are not riding racing bikes where a quick gear change is necessary. When doing slow speed turns with the clutch only engaging at the last 1/4 of an inch it is a real pain in the ass specially if you are older and on a cruiser motorcycle. No other bike that I have ever ridden has ever been like these V Star 650s. Like most others I have just let the adjustment out on my clutch cable so the clutch lever engages half way out as it should. You do not get a full clutch movement at the clutch plates but the clutch disengages well enough to change gears with out any problems, at least on my motorcycle. The fitting of the spring makes the clutch lever return fully when you disengage the clutch.

I tried the Clevver but it just put a bad kink in my cable that would have eventually broken it. While I had it on my motorcycle it was no better than just letting the adjustment out on my clutch cable and using the spring for the lever return. The Clevver in my opinion is not very Clever at all other than making money out of desperate V Star 650 owners. My Clevver was just a standard brand new V Star 650 alloy clutch lever with a new hole drilled through for the cable knob end to fit into. A complete waste of my money and it is sitting in a draw some where in my shed now.
 

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1982 XV1100,1989 XT600Z Tenere, 2008 F800ST
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The Yamaha MT07 (FZ07 in some markets) have a similarly abrupt clutch engagement, although nearer the handlebar grip. Easier to use, but still not very easy to modulate. The hydraulic clutch on my Beemer have a long, smooth engagement travel and is a delight. You never stall, you never have a harsh shift, you never struggle to find the engagement point during delicate riding. However, different riders have different preferences; my son loves his MT07 and hates my BMW, I tolerate his Yamaha and love my Beemer clutch.
 

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2007 Yamaha V Star 650 custom, 2007 HondaVTX 1300R
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163 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 · (Edited)
I'm going to wait until the end of the riding season and open her up. Page 4-41 in the manual shows how to adjust the clutch push rod if the 2 marks don't lline up for the push lever assembly. Mine aren't lined up. To do this I gotta drain the oil, take the front pipe off, remove the crank case cover... so I'll be ordering a new gasket, crush washers, O rings, do an oil and filter change and maybe replace the clutch while I'm at it. We'll see if this makes an improvement
 

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I'm going to wait until the end of the riding season and open her up. Page 4-41 in the manual shows how to adjust the clutch push rod if the 2 marks to line up for the push lever assembly. Mine aren't lined up. To do this I gotta drain the oil, take the front pipe off, remove the crank case cover... so I'll be ordering a new gasket, crush washers, O rings, do an oil and filter change and maybe replace the clutch while I'm at it. We'll see if this makes an improvement
A bit more than I want to bite off but curious of your results. Good luck!
 

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2006 Yamaha 650 V Star Classic Cruiser.
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152 Posts
I'm going to wait until the end of the riding season and open her up. Page 4-41 in the manual shows how to adjust the clutch push rod if the 2 marks don't lline up for the push lever assembly. Mine aren't lined up. To do this I gotta drain the oil, take the front pipe off, remove the crank case cover... so I'll be ordering a new gasket, crush washers, O rings, do an oil and filter change and maybe replace the clutch while I'm at it. We'll see if this makes an improvement
Hi Froski and you are on the right track. The manual says how to adjust the clutch and I think that adjusting the clutch in this way should put every thing back to how it came from the factory. I have bought a new gasket so that I can do this adjustment but I have not had time to do it yet but I will try to do it in the next 2 weeks. It is easy to do but just takes time. My marks do not line up either. I think that they may have done when the bike was new. The old bloke that I bought my bike from said that the only thing that he had done was a new set of clutch plates put in. I think that when the workshop that did this work they did not adjust the clutch as it states in the manual and it has been wrong ever since. I can do all that work myself and so I will put the clutch adjustment back to how it is in the workshop manual and hope that things will as you say make an improvement. If you put 2 pieces of 1/2 inch wooden plank under each wheel and then put the motorcycle on the side stand you can take the crankcase cover off and you will not have to drain the oil as it drains to the other side of the engine out of the clutch crankcase cover.
 

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2007 Yamaha V Star 650 custom, 2007 HondaVTX 1300R
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Hi Froski and you are on the right track. The manual says how to adjust the clutch and I think that adjusting the clutch in this way should put every thing back to how it came from the factory. I have bought a new gasket so that I can do this adjustment but I have not had time to do it yet bit will try to do it in the next 2 weeks. It is easy to do but just takes time. My marks do not line up either. I think that they may have done when the bike was new. The old bloke that I bought my bike from said that the only thing that he had done was a new set of clutch plates put in. I think that then the workshop that did this work did not adjust the clutch as it states in the manual and it has been wrong ever since. I can do all that work myself and so I will put the clutch adjustment back to how it is in the workshop manual and hope that things will as you say make an improvement. If you put 2 pieces of 1/2 inch wooden plank under each wheel and then put the motorcycle on the side stand you can take the crankcase cover off and you will not have to drain the oil as it drains to the other side of the engine out of the clutch crankcase cover.

Keep us posted about this project. I'm hoping this will be the solution. I could get used to it as it is but it's not my only bike and going form my VTX to my V Star, the clutch release is very distracting
 

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2006 V star 650
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16 Posts
When doing slow speed turns with the clutch only engaging at the last 1/4 of an inch it is a real pain in the ass specially if you are older and on a cruiser motorcycle
Slow turns should be done with rpm's around 1500-1800 rpm slipping the clutch, known as 'friction zone manipulation' the clutch lever travel has nothing to do with it, there is plenty of wiggle room where it's at, slow speed turns with clutch all the way out and low rpm is sure way to drop a bike in a turn under 5mph. With the lever set up as it is, you can tease the friction zone, something you cant easily do when you have to grab a fistful of lever movement, Yamaha knew that and they put a lot of thought into that idea.

Make sure your clutch lever is pointing slightly down so your arm and wrist are in a straight line when applying the clutch, so you don't have to reach out to grab it or have an awkward stretch.
Too many people want to make mods and crutch on the clutch, it's on many forums as you said Bob, but practice with bike you bought is the answer.
 

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2006 Yamaha 650 V Star Classic Cruiser.
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152 Posts
Slow turns should be done with rpm's around 1500-1800 rpm slipping the clutch, known as 'friction zone manipulation' the clutch lever travel has nothing to do with it, there is plenty of wiggle room where it's at, slow speed turns with clutch all the way out and low rpm is sure way to drop a bike in a turn under 5mph. With the lever set up as it is, you can tease the friction zone, something you cant easily do when you have to grab a fistful of lever movement, Yamaha knew that and they put a lot of thought into that idea.

Make sure your clutch lever is pointing slightly down so your arm and wrist are in a straight line when applying the clutch, so you don't have to reach out to grab it or have an awkward stretch.
Too many people want to make mods and crutch on the clutch, it's on many forums as you said Bob, but practice with bike you bought is the answer.
Well I disagree. Just today I have taken my clutch cover off and adjusted the clutch how the workshop manual says to do it and I now have a beautiful clutch with a proper friction zone. It just takes doing the job how it is supposed to be done to fix the problem. I will be posting how I did the job tomorrow with pictures. This will be a proper help to people rather than saying just get used to how it is even though it is obviously felt to be wrong by majority of riders that own these motorcycles.
 

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