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I am attempting one more time to install my new risers before farming it out to the dealer. I am down to the bolts that keep stock risers onto main tree. Does anyone know the size of the ethic allen wrench necessary to get those dang things out? Any other help would be appreciated. I know there ay be heat involved but I am really not sure I can do that sort of thing. Or am I. Thanks.

Mechanically Inept Mike
 

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hmmmmm, been a long time since I removed the riser bolts from my old Star Warrior...
It might have been an M8 bolt that uses a 6mm allen wrench....or....was it an M10 bolt that takes a 8mm Allen wrench...it's one of the two,,,,,I think.

A fine help I am, ain't I?

Heat will help, get all the flammable stuff out of the way and have at the riser bolts from below with a propane torch. Do this using a several attempt method and count the seconds in your head while applying the heat, if the first count didn't do it, keep adding seconds and try again. After getting the area good and heated, hit the end of the bolt with a can of compressed air. Wear eye protection to save your sight from the tiny rust particles that may fly off at several thousnad miles per hour...alright that was an exaggeration but that stuff flies off wicked fast. DO NOT squirt it with WD-40 after getting it hot unless you enjoy using a fire extinguisher.
 

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Don't try it with just an allen wrench !

You will just get frustrated, I just installed the HR1 risers a month back on the Strat, the large nut jobs on the bottom are the hard part, they are locked in place with some kind of locktight. I didn't need heat, just lots of leverage, tried a small pipe on the long handled allen wrench, no good, so changed over to a socket type allen head with a 1/2 drive long handled rachet, finally got them broken loose, I thought for sure I would strip out or break of the allen head bolts, but got them out, no stripping, and no heat, I do work with metal, allot, so have different idea's about the canned air use, Your not heating up the metal to expand then contract it, your heating it up to melt the locktight. This is probably what's getting people confused. Now here's a small lesson, for non metal fabricators. Metal does expand when heated to the right temps, read this as welding torch type heat, you do get a small bit with the propane torches, but not enough to do the expanding, and then you think you can cool it fast with canned air. Some may be succesfull, but here's what happens when you heat up steel, it gets bigger, and when it cools, it get smaller than it was before you heated it up, so what do you think happens if the part your heating is the female (nut) around a threaded bolt. Ask away, I can give more examples of this if your interested. If your removing a tight metal to metal fastener, you do want to heat it up and try removing it while being hot and still expanded. And I will shrink back to sometimes a smaller diameter than original when cooled, there are books written on this vary subject. different cooling methods, how to soften or harden the metals. How the heat effects the metals if your not heating it to the right temps. Or in some cases, heating it too much, normally this will ruin the hardness of the metal and the part would have to be replaced. Hope this will help someone out there Fighting with a stuborn bolt oneday.
Use a long handled rachet or long breaker bar, with a socketed alllen bit installed, and also a 6pt socket on another good sized rachet on the bottom nut. And mod carefully.
 

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So I guess you figger the ol hair dryer method may not work, huh?:confused::eek::D:D

In cases like this I've always found a concentrated ion stream from a particle accelerator usually does the trick. As an added benefit, with its new cobalt blue aura, the bike will be visible both day and night.;)
 
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