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Discussion Starter #1
I’m afraid I’m approaching 26,600 MI on my Royal Star, and it’s about time for the first valve adjustment. I called a couple of dealers and was quoted about $800-900 for the job.

I’m mechanically astute, and wouldn’t mind tackling the job myself. However, I can’t seem to find instructions for the Royal Star Tour Deluxe. I currently have a 2005.

I’ve searched the threads here and have come across instructions for the 650 and the 950, but not the Royal Star.

I’ve no parts (yet), and don’t mind getting them, once I know what it is to get. I’ve checked out the service manual from manualslib online, but there aren’t any detailed instructions there.

I’m afraid I don’t know where else to turn, save for the dealership wanting $800 bucks. Would anyone have any suggestions for manuals, tools, walkthroughs, lessons learned, etc? Anything I may have overlooked or not searched properly? I’m all ears.

Thanks in advance
 

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we are not suppose to link to other MC forum websites, but this is the link for the 1998 to 2001? Royal Star Venture factory service manual

see chapter 3 page 7 - its all there:

https://www.venturerider.org/manuals/1996-2001 Royal Star LIT-11616-VZ-01.pdf

Your 2005 should be pretty much the same - I think this manual was published in 2001, but check and make sure your bike is not different somehow.

I dont know what manual you looked at that does not include the instructions for adjusting the valves, are you sure it wasnt the owners manual?
 

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a couple things about this

the V4 engine does not have adjustable tappets with a lock nut and screw - it has the little disk pads

you can tear the bike down and check the clearance with feeler gauges like any engine, but if any are out of spec you need a special tool to compress the valve spring to allow you to get the disk out. Then you need to get the disk of the right thickness to put the valve at the right clearance.

Its a bit more work, and you will have to run out and get the right disks if you need them (from a dealer I guess). It might take you a few days to do it yourself. Fortunately its only scheduled for every 26,000 miles.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I dont know what manual you looked at that does not include the instructions for adjusting the valves, are you sure it wasnt the owners manual?
It was this manual here:

https://www.manualslib.com/manual/1362718/Yamaha-Royal-Star-Tour-Deluxe-Xvz13cttc.html

Being that I bought the bike used, those manuals were the only ones I could lay my hands on.

Thank you for the link! I will definitely give it a read! Forum gods, please bestow grace upon us for linking to other threads lol!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
a couple things about this

the V4 engine does not have adjustable tappets with a lock nut and screw - it has the little disk pads

you can tear the bike down and check the clearance with feeler gauges like any engine, but if any are out of spec you need a special tool to compress the valve spring to allow you to get the disk out. Then you need to get the disk of the right thickness to put the valve at the right clearance.

Its a bit more work, and you will have to run out and get the right disks if you need them (from a dealer I guess). It might take you a few days to do it yourself. Fortunately its only scheduled for every 26,000 miles.
My goal is to order all of the parts to keep me from having the project span multiple days.

I commute to and from work on this bike, and man it’s a blessing. Here in Northern VA, motorcycles can take toll roads and utilize High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) lanes for free! Some of our tolls are dynamic, meaning that they increase in price as congestion increases. I’ve seen one way tolls as high as $52.

These disks; are they available as a set? Like can I order them and have extras available like one would have extra sockets or screwdrivers?

I really appreciate the help and suggestions!!!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
KCW, the manual I linked was in fact the correct service manual that I needed.

I performed my searches in that manual via mobile and didn’t realize that the pdf was 500+ pages long!

Even searching the table of contents for the word “valve” didn’t pull up the gold I was looking for!

At any rate, if there are any other RSTD owners out there looking for the supplementary service manual, it’s linked above.
 

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Section 3, page 7 starts valve adjustment section. It's very detailed.

 

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Discussion Starter #8
Section 3, page 7 starts valve adjustment section. It's very detailed.

Les, thanks!

I realized the manual had more to it when I switched from my mobile phone to desktop computer.

For some reason, I couldn’t see all of the manual on phone. But we’re cooking with grease now!
 

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they are called valve shim kits

you have to get a kit of shims that are the right diameter, and you get a box of maybe 32 different sizes with 3 or 4 of each size

and then hope you dont need 16 all the same size

I have never done valve adjustment this way before - usually on engines with the lock nut and screw on a 4 cylinder engine with 8 valves, maybe 2 or 3 would need adjusting

the royal star engine has 16 valves so if it follows the same trend maybe 4 or 6 would need to be changed? I dont know.

The full kits are about $35 from what I googled. Even if the tool is $50, compared to paying a shop $800 that is a deal I will take anyday.

I think you have to drain the coolant to get some hoses out of the way, so its a good time to change the antifreeze, and the fuel filter while you have the tank off, and the air filter because its on top of the carbs and hard to get off.

I would plan on a weekend at least, take your time, and get everything that makes sense to service while you have the carbs off the engine.

I know how you feel about not being able to ride. I took the back wheel from my VS650 to get the tire changed last summer, and it turned into 3 beautiful early summer days with no motorcycle.

Now I have two bikes so a few days down time on one of them is not a problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I’m knee deep in my first ever valve adjustment. Ordered all parts in advance and had them shipped to the house.

I’ll update this thread with progress and some lessons learned from my attempt in the event that someone else needs to do their valve checks on their bike! After all, these bikes are still rolling around today,l.

First off, would I do it again? Yes.

Is it hard? Yes.

Will you need to take your time? Yes.

Don’t rush through anything. I found that’s when I made the most mistakes.

Lessons learned:

1. Harbor Freight has the perfect feeler gauge for this job. I went to Autozone and Advance and they had feeler gauges, but not to the spec that the manual calls for.

Harbor Freight Feeler Gauge: https://www.harborfreight.com/Feeler-Gauge-32-Pc-63665.html

2. After you check what size shim rests in the engine, you have to put that same (incorrect) shim back in the engine until you have the correct shim you need to swap in hand, ready to be inserted. I made the mistake of pulling two shims out, and noticed that the lifter pad of the first shim I had pulled, was interfering with the cam lobe, and panic ensued. I worked the tool back and forth to get the pad back in. It seems though that you must re-insert that shim back in though. In other words, there must be a shim present at all times while manually spinning the crankshaft so that the cam love does not interfere with the lifter pad.

Cam lobe: This is the angled, rotating piece of aluminum.

Lifter pad: this is the piece of aluminum that the shim “sits” in.

3. Put screws back in their respective holes when unscrewing things. It’ll help you button the bike up later.

As I’m still working on the bike, I’ll continue to update!
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I do have one question though:

It seems like in order for me to get the tappet tool inserted, I must turn the crank counter clockwise and insert/guide the tool into position.

I’ve assumed that in order to remove it, I must rotate the engine clockwise to remove? Is this correct?

I’m just looking to confirm as the engine normally spends counter clockwise and not clockwise.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Out of the 16 valves, only two were within spec.

I created the attached “map/drawing” of the bike from a top down perspective to help with mapping the clearances and their respective locations on the bike, where:

Red: outside spec
Green: within spec
Yellow: Falling on either end of the spec
Blue: Scratch notes/Relevant info

Some shims I swapped out with another valve, and others I had to pick up from the local motorcycle shop.

Anyone have any idea on how to replace the foam gaskets that were around the crankcase breather/air plenums? Mine are coated in oil and are falling apart.
 

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Im dont know about having to turn the crank to insert the tool.

Make sure you know which way the engine is suppose to crank, I have not read the manual for the V4 engine but I know at least some of the Vtwins spin in the opposite direction of the front wheel. This is very unusual on motorcycles. Normally the flywheel spins in the same direction of the wheels to add to the gyroscopic forces that make the bike self balancing and stable. V star engineers decided the bikes needed to be more nimble, so by spinning the engine in the opposite direction it cancels out some of the rotational inertia of the front wheel, and makes the bike more responsive to pressure on the handlebar grips. The service manual should state clearly which way to hand crank the engine over (depending on which side has the wrench on the crankshaft). Again: check the service manual on this, I know the 650 and 1100 spin "backwards" - I dont know for the V4.

With a timing chain you do not want to spin the engine backwards, because the tensioner will go slack and the relationship between the crank and the cams will be several degrees off. I dont think its enough to cause the pistons to hit the valves while you are turning it over by hand, but the timing marks might not match exactly cam to crank when you turn it backwards. WHen doing the valves if I go past the mark I always go all the way around again, another 720 degrees.

About pulling the disks out to see what size they are: are they marked where you can see them in place, maybe spinning them a bit? Then you would be able to figure out what replacement size you need before you pull it out, and do it all at the same time. If they are not marked where you can see them, then if you write down what you put in for each one and keep that, then next time you will know what each one is.

Im not sure what the drawing numbers mean, but Im curious for the valves that were out of tolerance how far out were they? You have to measure the actual gap to determine what size disk is needed, right?

were any of them tight, or really tight? Its ok if valves get loose and noisy up to a point, but if they wear tighter eventually the valves will be held open, will backfire and burn the valve mating surfaces. Im wondering which way they tend to go? From my experience on air cooled engines they tended to wear looser and looser. Finding a tight one was unusual.

If they tend to wear and become loose the engine will get tappy, some performance will be lost because the valves are not opening as far as the could, but it wont hurt anything if you run a few thousand miles past the scheduled adjustment period. If they wear tight it could get very expensive to ignore the schedule.

The foam gaskets have to be a standard Yamaha maintenance part - from a dealer or an OEM parts website.

If I did not mention it before, any O rings between parts you took off, if the bike has several years on it then its cheap to replace the o rings compared to putting it all back together and then finding out one or more of them would not re-seal and now they leak. They do get stiff over the years, and will not seal sometimes when re-assembled. There is an o-ring pinch test you can do if you want to try to test them - google it, its a common topic of debate on motorcycles whether to re-use them or replace them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Updating for anyone new tackling this job themselves.

I literally just finished the bike this past Sunday.

I tried removing all of the shims that needed adjusting at the same time. Some of these shims were in different cylinders, which required me rotating the crankshaft while the shims were not placed in their buckets.

BIG NO NO.

The maximum number of buckets you can change and adjust is 2, and they MUST be within the same cylinder, same bay, in order to keep the cam lobes from interfering with the buckets (valve lifters) when the shim is absent. Ex:

X X || O O
O O || O O

O O || O O
O O || O O

• Where “X” are the valves you are checking/swapping buckets

• “O” are the valves with the shims still in their respective buckets

• “||” is the timing chain

My valve adjustment turned into a valve lifter replacement, which required me ordering lifters (aka buckets; these are the buckets that the shims sit in) and waiting for them to arrive, because they were on backorder.

Once the buckets arrived, that then required placement under the camshaft, which meant removing the cams. And of course, Murphy had his way. While the cams were removed, the sprockets holding the chains had to come out, and during this procedure, the timing chain tensioners had to be loosened and removed.

But wait, there’s more!!!

Whilst reinstalling the cams, the timing was knocked out of sync. By this point, I was ready to burn the bike.

So I went and bought a gold wing. 🤣😂 That kept me rolling while I continued working on the Royal Star.

She’s all buttoned up now, and running again, fine as can be.

I’ve learned SO much about this bike.... More than what I wanted to know and initially signed up for LOL

Special shout out to Brooke Farquhar of Motoworks in Fredericksburg, Virginia. His DIY motorcycle shop, knowledge, and expertise saved me tons of $ that would have been spent if I took the bike to a full service motorcycle shop, paid someone else to do the labor, and learned nothing in return.
 

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^ thanks for the update - Im reluctant to click on Like for your post because you had a terrible experience, I dont think anyone would like what happened

so the real issue is you just do the two valves at the same time (two shims) and then move to the next one. I expect the service manual should have made that clear, maybe not, maybe you missed that.

My Royal Star is just under 28k miles and due for this - think I will wait till the end of the season, or first thing next spring.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
KCW, I’m definitely willing to aid in any way when you get ready to do yours. With all my wrongdoing, I’m sure I could point you right lol
 
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