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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
any of you use general clear silicone sealant when doing electrical soldering? or any electrical connections? from what i'm reading, it is an excellent insulator where cured/hardened, but while it is in gel form (fresh out of the tube) it can be corrosive to some metals if it contains acetic acid. i'm having to re-solder my resistors to the capacitors of my LED spotlights since 3/4 of them vibrated off the connection. i'm using some loctite clear silicone waterproof sealant to basically hold them in place to the insides of the light housings. looks like i will need to buy some "neutral cure", "non-corrosive", or "non-acidic" sealant to apply directly to the capacitor that the resistors are soldered to help keep the connections from vibrating loose.


 

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Four year degree in Electronics Technology and I did not know that! I've often thought about using silicone that way, though. Thanks for the tip!

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I've used clear waterproof silicone inside electrical boxes out side where water was causing shorts. I fill the box up 100% with it a few years ago, never had a short after that. Worked good for me.
 

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if you are going to glue down parts that will not get hot, then hot glue works well

epoxy is also a good choice, and it wont melt if the parts get warm

the thing you have to be careful of, if part like that big resistor creates a lot of heat, then you dont want to encapsulate it so the heat cannot dissipate

if you have a board assembly that is subject to vibration, as long as its all low power stuff, and nothing gets hot, you can pot the entire board with epoxy, like a brick.

if you need to do that with hi power parts that will get hot, there is special potting material that is heat conductive , but its expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
i decided to go with the GE 100% waterproof/weatherproof clear silicone for the electrical connection. not what i was expecting. the loctite silicone you can see here comes out as a gel and is easily moldable to the 'stems' of the resistor and able to provide damping. but the GE stuff came out in liquid form and kind of ran out all over the area i applied it to. well hopefully this will be good enough.

 

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OK so apparently that liquid stuff that first came out of the GE weatherproof sealant tube was just some type of separation from the actual sealant. like the watery stuff in a mustard or ketchup bottle before you get to the good stuff.
 

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Uh, that's not supposed to happen! I'm sorry, I just can't help but to laugh at that. The ketchup/mustard analogy did me in!

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That would be the correct stuff Les. Also, you should have used heat shrink or a piece of wire insulation around your leads right up to the solder connection.
Some other great advice is, put dielectric grease in ALL your plug connectors wherever you can reach them. It keeps any moisture out of the joint and prevents contact (pin) corrosion.
 

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OK so apparently that liquid stuff that first came out of the GE weatherproof sealant tube was just some type of separation from the actual sealant. like the watery stuff in a mustard or ketchup bottle before you get to the good stuff.
That would be correct!
On a side note, it would have also been good to shorten the leads from the resistor. That way you have less movement.
 

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i would do some research on it first. i do not have a degree in electronics and am i just going by what some others have posted. and i am great at finding ways to screw things up with regards to my bike and life in general.
I am really good at screwing things up. I just regard it as practice.
And boy i get plenty of practice. After the third time i usually get it right and move on to the next thing to screw up.
 
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