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Discussion Starter #1
So does anyone here own a sport bike to compliment their Star? My buddy just picked up a 2007 Yamaha R6. I was never into sport bikes before that, but riding with him...makes me want more speed. I sure would hate to sell my baby to get one but I feel like the need for speed is taking hold of me. I put together a bike group of college students (see my signature link), and we had our first meet up saturday. To my surprise I was the only cruiser leading a crew of sportys... and they were stunting pretty hard.

Does anybody get frustrated with the weak top end on their star? I hate pushing it up to ninety and feeling like I'm topping out. :(
 

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sport bikes are toys for boys. cruisers are for men. you shouldn't feel left out. if you stick with your cruiser, you will still be riding it or a different cruiser long after most of those guys put away their sportbike phase and move on to some other flavor of the week hobby.
 

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showing my age but still own and can't part with my '84 turo charged GPZ 750. Would like to pick up a dirt bike again too some day.
 

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It's all about low and slow for me now. I ride with a group from work and they all run sport bikes. We all ride our own style and pace. I usually pass them later in the ride while they're stretching their backs and shaking out their arms on the side of the road. They're usually good for 300-400kms a day at most. I can run an easy 600-800kms.
To each his own as long as we all arrive safely.
 

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Live by the sword, die by the sword

I see you have stumbled onto the dichotomy of motorcycling. The forking into two divisions of desire to participate with squids of speed, and (pardon the term) geezers, for longer comfortable lumbering runs where flash and chrome reside. For most, we are held captive by funding limitations set forth by that thing called life, where mortgage and family will eventually consume all discretionary spending and pretty much dictates a path for you. C'est la vie! You be certain to study hard in college so that you are able fill an entire stable full of different types of bikes based on riding mood. Understand the rest of us fill pages of motorcycle magazines with reviews and commentary and also visit motorcycle showrooms trying to find that one magical bullet of a bike to fulfill all of one's needs for quick stints, touring, and crusing comfort. Eventually it is less about the motorcycle's existing features and technological advances, it merely becomes more like where the potential owner is willing to make the biggest compromise in performance or comfort.

I ride with a couple of guys that can't seem to break away from the sport bikes so I know exactly what you're talking about. They had raced previously at New Hampshire Speedway and went through race school so riding is always a brisk pace. Both owned a Roadliner at one time, so they know my capabilities and limitations, but they went back to sport bikes just because they want faster and better handling. It's okay, I'm on the best possible cruiser for this challenge which has all the handling and power needed, plus at the end of the day, we all have fun in our own way. It also allows me to blow the extra carbon out as if there were some or I needed an excuse.:) One guy is on a Kawi ZX-14 and also owns a ZX-10 and the other just traded his Bandit for a low mileage Gixxer 1000. He's owned Busas before, and frankly, I don't know how he landing on the Bandit b/c it was so out of character. They have their spurts where they may break away but I'm not too far behind for them to worry and I know they will reach their limit on the amount of miles they can travel long before I even settle into my ride. Of course, it's extremely funny to watch the two old men (in the early 40's) climb off their torture devices and waddle around until they get feeling back into their hips. They are true squids that can't seem to grow up.

Having said all that, instead of two bikes, I think you might even consider a move to a bigger Star. Granted a vtwin does not perform to the level of a 4 (v or I) but a Warrior is a nice blend of sport and cruiser and can do 140 MPH on command. The aluminium frame also handles pretty darn good too.

Most importantly though, you be extremely careful letting the peer pressure push you towards stunting and speed. Keep your head on straight even in the college years when life seems limitless and mortality is never a thought. Remember that frontal lobe is still not fully developed to make rational decisions. It's also a dangerous endevour when you are being moved in a direction outside your comfort zone while riding and begin riding on ego. You've got your whole life ahead of you, you don't need to harm youself, or worst perhaps an innocent person getting too reckless on the street.
 

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I'm in my forties and my frontal lobe isn't fully developed. LOL
Great advice. Even better commentary. You have anymore Motoliner? I have a sneaky feeling that your name is attached to an article or two.
 

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I have had a virago before, moved onto sportsbikes and have come back to an xvs1100 after 10 years
I am 41

Still keeping two Ducatis as they are, for me, characterful whilst still quick quick - I live in the twisty Yorkshire Dales

Have had Kwaks and Suzuki road/race bikes and whilst very very quick there was no 'pride' in ownership or character with the bikes - they were a 'tool' nothing more

I couldnt comtemplate ditching the speed - the cruiser for me is an 'and' not an 'or' - I am v lucky - they are very different horses for very different courses
 

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I had a cruiser a few years back. Family life dictated that I had to sell it. Last year I bought a Suzuki Katana. Rode it for the year and was relatively happy with it. Took it out the first of this year and then I bought the V Star. Now the crotch rocket is for sale. I didn't mind the ride and the little bit of power but I have never been one for much speed. Once I climbed on the Star it was a no brainer that hunched over like a dog [email protected]#$king a football was not the answer for me. I much rather prefer the cruiser but maybe you should try one of your friends bike for a longer ride and see what you think.
 

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My first bike was a 84 Honda Interceptor 500. I loved that bike because you had the quickness of a sport bike while still being able to sit up. On a cruiser now and I love it, but I did enjoy riding the Buell Blast 500 while taking my Motorcycle Safety Course...actually thought of buying one just to put around on from time to time.
 

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i've toyed with the idea of getting a cheap, used ninja just for grins, and to see what it does with my riding style. could be fun, but i just don't see myself not having an accident on it
Yeah, I know what you mean. I had a Nissan Frontier that couldn't be accused of being quick...just picked up a Dodge Nitro with the 4.0L V6 and I am noticing a slight difference in my driving pattern.

Maybe a quick little sport bike isn't the best for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I've been looking very hard at a lot of different sport bikes. Almost traded my v-star for a CBR600 f4i, which got a lot of great reviews from folks I know who've owned them, but ended up scrubbing the trade. I could feel the bike's power but it definitely felt very small - my forearms were actually on my thighs.

However I've sat on a few of the sport/touring models and they feel much more natural - specifically I'm very interested the Kawi zx14, Triumph Sprint ST1050, or even a hyabusa (even though they look kind of stupid). The triumph intrigues me the most because of the triple engine but I've never ridden one/around one. I've got a buddy with a zx14 and he's a little bigger than me but seems pretty comfortable on it. Any thoughts on these bikes or the 3-cylinder engines?
 

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to summarize Motoliner:
1. You can have your cake and eat it too IF you have enough dough.
2. The warrior is a comprimise of the best of both toys
3. Don't be stupid.
 

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If it's flash and bragging rights you're after, the ZX14 is the beginning and end when it comes to sport bikes. A little more stretched out and not as sporty or racy feeling as the Busa plus you can become part of the Rickey Gadson clan who I got to meet at the NY IMS. :) It's an awesome bike with gobbs of power above 6K RPMs but one heck of a leap from a vstar. I rode my buddies after we removed the butterflies and remapped it which has the full titanium TiForce exhaust. Damn scary fast -no joke! I'm 6'2" and my legs were still cramped and the hips began to hurt long before I ever wanted but I also turn 40 this year so I guess I'm becoming an old man. Perhaps it is muscles that could be developed but I'd hate to spend the dough and find out I could not ride great distances. He also had a couple of past ZX10's which were quick and handled great but the wrist angle and laying over the tank took some getting used to compared to cruisers. If it were me, I'd check out that new Ninja1000 which seems to be the best of both worlds and might not suck up all your gas money on insurance but it does still bear the Ninja name so it might not be that great of a savings. I have not priced it out but I suspect it's a little easier on your wallet. Sport bike guys complain b/c it's tuned down (geared different and top speed limiter) from the ZX10 but they forget that HP and torque is only part of the equation in the hands of a capable rider and that a little skill goes a long way plus chain/sprockets are only temporary and can be swapped out too. I also like the FZ1 but it's due for the GenIII model to be rolled out with cross plane crankshaft so I'm holding out.
 
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