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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just completed Total Control 1 and at the end of the class, they go over suspension and the instructor chose my Strat amongst a sea of BMW's (because he knew it would make a good example!) to demonstrate the pogo effect of a poor front end. I knew the front end was weak but, not this bad. :eek:

He suggested stiffer springs alone would make a world of difference and, if I wanted to spend more, to put emulators in as well.

Thoughts? Opines?

Thanks!
 

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Front springs

Larry,

Sorry to hear that, I didn't know I had a problem. I guess the pogo affect must be the front wheel jumping up after a bump? I have never had any sense of a problem. I do hear a noise that sounds like a rush of fluid when I hit a large bump like a speed bump.

I see some occasional talk about progressive springs, but I think that is mostly to lower the bike. Don't know if they would help or not.

Me I think you would have to be doing some serious hard riding to have the need so I will stay stock. It is a cruiser not a sport bike.

Tell us more about pogo affect. I did search and found some info. One post suggested changing shock oil. After reading I do also notice if I hold the front brake to long coming into a curve I have poor control. Figure that's normal. Seems it has more to do with braking than bumps.

http://splashmedia.co.nz/users/britten/art3.html

Thanks Dave
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Larry,

Sorry to hear that, I didn't know I had a problem. I guess the pogo affect must be the front wheel jumping up after a bump? I have never had any sense of a problem. I do hear a noise that sounds like a rush of fluid when I hit a large bump like a speed bump.

I see some occasional talk about progressive springs, but I think that is mostly to lower the bike. Don't know if they would help or not.

Me I think you would have to be doing some serious hard riding to have the need so I will stay stock. It is a cruiser not a sport bike.

Tell us more about pogo affect. I did search and found some info. One post suggested changing shock oil. After reading I do also notice if I hold the front brake to long coming into a curve I have poor control. Figure that's normal. Seems it has more to do with braking than bumps.

http://splashmedia.co.nz/users/britten/art3.html

Thanks Dave

I'm a big rider to begin with, 6' 2", 260. It has felt soft to begin with, bottoming regularly but, I am not aggressive, at least not until this class! Plus, my knowledge and experience is limited.

The way it was demonstrated to us was a firm push down on the handlebars and watch it rebound. Obviously, this was intended as a parking lot beginner demonstration to give us an idea, not a full technical explanation.

In any event, he wanted to see a rebound back up and a very slight start back down then still. My bike when he pushed down, bounced back up, then down, then up then slightly down; pogo.

I was two up last week, loaded up but good, and we hit, (I drove over) a drain on the edge of our road and it sent my passenger up out of her seat a bit. I didn't panic and she settled right away but, I could see a deep enough bump really unsettling her. Thus, too springy, weak spring, spring over loaded and compressing too far as I understand it.

No one else has this problem? I felt like I was simply getting used to and riding TO the bike. After this class, I take the turns much, much better and I want the bike to be improved TO me as my skill improves.

Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Larry,

Glad nobody got hurt. Thanks, after reading I know a little more myself.

Dave
Thanks. However, it wasn't even close to dangerous in that incident. Just unsettling, attention getting, to bounce up like that. :D

The problem would be in a turn, flopped over, on a rough surface where it starts wanting to bounce too much and start 'walking' me wide. :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
OK, dealer says they can put in progressive springs and/or use a heavier oil. The cost of doing the oil is something like 80% of doing the springs and the oil so, logic being logic, looks like I'm gonna go for both. Then, they're gonna work with me on the shock to balance the suspension, front and rear. Hope to not need a new shock as well but, there really isn't much travel to the adjustment.

We'll see.


In the mean time, my enjoyment of this machine is a daily thing. Bit hoppy and sure looking forward to a firmer suspension but, in the mean time, love riding this thing more every day.

Learning to use more clutch and throttle to smooth out the ride and lessen the lugging that I find between first and second and second and third. There was NONE of this on the bike I came off of; gsx1300r. :lol:
 

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Decent progressive springs are around $65 and a good set of emulators are right at $140. The addition of the emulators will make the most difference in keeping the front suspension from unwarranted rebounding. The progressives will slow the compression rate, and may keep the forks off the bottom, but will not stop the rebound effect when hitting a pothole or other road defect. That requires the emulators that improve suspension and ride, or the use of very heavy oil that makes them ride like a truck.

Installation of both is a fairly simple afternoon project for the average guy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Decent progressive springs are around $65 and a good set of emulators are right at $140. The addition of the emulators will make the most difference in keeping the front suspension from unwarranted rebounding. The progressives will slow the compression rate, and may keep the forks off the bottom, but will not stop the rebound effect when hitting a pothole or other road defect. That requires the emulators that improve suspension and ride, or the use of very heavy oil that makes them ride like a truck.

Installation of both is a fairly simple afternoon project for the average guy.
Thanks, RCW.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I searched came up with this. Interesting, I might think that the average cruiser owner has little use for much of this stuff. Guess that is why ther is such a wide range of bikes and accessories.

http://www.motorcyclecruiser.com/tech/race_tech_cartridge_emulator/index.html

Dave
Sounds like they're liking it!

From your link:

We found our Classic's emulated fork to be much improved in all riding situations. Gone were the two criticisms we had of the stock fork, the sweeping turn wobble and the highway expansion joint rocking. Bumps of virtually any size pass beneath us without upsetting the chassis. The bike's stability and control in cornering increased our confidence at any speed. The front wheel felt more planted yet more compliant than it previously had. By reducing the squatting in corners, the Classic's ground clearance also improved noticeably. The only thing we'd like to change about the fork now is not connected to the Cartridge Emulator at all: We'd like a bit more rebound damping since the fork extends a bit quickly after being compressed (most noticeably after braking), but a slightly higher viscosity oil should lick the problem. The Race Tech Gold Valve Cartridge Emulator works so well we're trying to decide which of our personal bikes we are going to add them to first.
 
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