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Discussion Starter #1
During some of my trips I end up needing a ferry. I have two crossings coming up this year. My Roadstar was easy to tie down to the boat deck given there was so much open metal to reach without scratching the painted surfaces. The SVTC has a lot of fiberglass and will be more difficult to tie down without the strap coming into contact with a painted surface. The only conclusion I have come up with so far to tighten the bike down to the deck is to put a strap across the seat (but I hope it doesn't impact the seat warming device). Has anyone strapped their SVTC to a boat deck yet and how did you do it?
 

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I was intending to trailer my SV home from the dealer to save an hour's trip for my wife. My dealer implored me to reconsider until I had a decent wheel chock device; "decent" - implied, because he kept saying "Condor", the most expensive one I have seen.
I ended up driving home from work that night, and she dropped me off the following day...then I rode the bike home after work.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was intending to trailer my SV home from the dealer to save an hour's trip for my wife. My dealer implored me to reconsider until I had a decent wheel chock device; "decent" - implied, because he kept saying "Condor", the most expensive one I have seen.
I ended up driving home from work that night, and she dropped me off the following day...then I rode the bike home after work.
Thanks but not an option on a ferry. They require you to tie down your bike securely to the deck using straps hooked to the deck so as the boat moves around your bike doesn't fall over.
 

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I did that, once, on the Blue Nose from Portland to Halifax. What we discovered in the process was that the Fundy Coastline was much more fun to ride! The ferry ride was fine, though I did wonder about the bike at about 2 AM when I woke up thinking I was going to slide right out of my bunk.... I was on a Road Star then - not much help... I think that if you remove the seat, the frame is just above the stuff, stuffed in there...cover with plastic, (trash bag and tape or a bungie) if you are expecting rough seas?
 

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With my Condor on trips, I run straps around my Eluder forks about half way up and one to my sissy bar. For a short crossing, couldn't you just use your handlebars and just make them tight, not torqued to compression on front fork?

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Discussion Starter #6
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With my Condor on trips, I run straps around my Eluder forks about half way up and one to my sissy bar. For a short crossing, couldn't you just use your handlebars and just make them tight, not torqued to compression on front fork?

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I considered that, but it depends on where the hooks are positioned on the floor of the boat deck, I think it is more secure crossing the seat and I should be able to crank down a bit which will push down the front and rear suspension. I would remove the seat but that I don't believe is quick removal.

Anyone strapped down a STVC onto a boat deck yet? or am I leading the way :)
 

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I considered that, but it depends on where the hooks are positioned on the floor of the boat deck, I think it is more secure crossing the seat and I should be able to crank down a bit which will push down the front and rear suspension. I would remove the seat but that I don't believe is quick removal.

Anyone strapped down a STVC onto a boat deck yet? or am I leading the way :)
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The stock seat removal is a process of time and frustration. I have modified mine by eliminating the two side hex bolts and need for two side pan removals by using for hold down just one push pin on the right side where I don't need tools to remove the pan. The push pin is the type that is about an inch long, has a ring on one end and a small spring loaded ball on the other. It fits a little loose, but only wiggles when I'm getting on the bike and never comes off accidentally.

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Discussion Starter #10
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The stock seat removal is a process of time and frustration. I have modified mine by eliminating the two side hex bolts and need for two side pan removals by using for hold down just one push pin on the right side where I don't need tools to remove the pan. The push pin is the type that is about an inch long, has a ring on one end and a small spring loaded ball on the other. It fits a little loose, but only wiggles when I'm getting on the bike and never comes off accidentally.

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Thanks Ron, given I am just loading and unloading the bike I will leave the seat on based on what you said and if need be strap over it unless someone has done something better to strap their bike to the deck.
 

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Thanks Ron, given I am just loading and unloading the bike I will leave the seat on based on what you said and if need be strap over it unless someone has done something better to strap their bike to the deck.
Hey RobG
I had to strap mine SVTC down on a flatbed when it died on me.
First we place it on the kick/side stand and then I ran a few straps on the passenger foot rests but I used another strap to pull the strap from the foot rest away from the side bag on each side. Then I put a strap on each fork but I tied the the strap and tied up the metal hook so it wouldn't damage anything.
If you can take off the side bags it would be a little easier.
Then the bike was picked up by the dealer with a trailer and they strapped the handle bars and forks. Again then tied the straps around the handle and forks and then tied up the metal hook to prevent damage. Again on the kick/side stand (wasn't a big fan of it but it worked) I know probable not a boat deck but maybe the flatbed would be closer to a boat tie down.
Here is a picture on the trailer. I hope it come thru.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hey RobG
I had to strap mine SVTC down on a flatbed when it died on me.
First we place it on the kick/side stand and then I ran a few straps on the passenger foot rests but I used another strap to pull the strap from the foot rest away from the side bag on each side. Then I put a strap on each fork but I tied the the strap and tied up the metal hook so it wouldn't damage anything.
If you can take off the side bags it would be a little easier.
Then the bike was picked up by the dealer with a trailer and they strapped the handle bars and forks. Again then tied the straps around the handle and forks and then tied up the metal hook to prevent damage. Again on the kick/side stand (wasn't a big fan of it but it worked) I know probable not a boat deck but maybe the flatbed would be closer to a boat tie down.
Here is a picture on the trailer. I hope it come thru.
Thank you, I appreciate the suggestion!!
 

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THE Bluenose on the back of a dime or a ferry also named the Blue Nose? I assume the latter.
Definitely not the one on the Canadian dime. That's a restored sloop from the 1800s. There used to be a high speed ferry from Portland ME to Yarmouth NS called The Cat but I think that was sent to Australia a few years back. Not sure what's operating there now.

And yes, the Fundy coast is an amazing ride. One of my favorites.
 

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Ah! I know the image on the dime....Again, I'm not always correct, but if a "high speed" ferry left Portland just before Sunset in August and arrived Yarmouth well after sunrise, then we were on "The Cat" and my father just called it the "Blue Nose" - he bought the tickets...One ride on that big ol' stink pot was enough for me...I remember wondering if the "new" catamaran was a nicer boat... On subsequent trips we sheltered at the Fundy National Park. Those were great rides. felt like a 20 degree lean into the wind on Canso Causeway, just to maintain a straight line! Eyes popping at the sight of what looked like surf coming of the tops of the 18-wheelers coming at us.... I believe I was on my Royal Star, so it would have been around the year 2000.

Rob,
If you throw a 4mm, T handle, hex into your bags, I think the seat removal is fairly easy...I've done it several times trying to chase down antenna issues... (weak FM reception and poor CB Tx.) If you do it a couple times at home, it should be a breeze (lol) on a boat. Especially, if you have a passenger to whom you can pass the screws and the side plates as you remove them.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Ah! I know the image on the dime....Again, I'm not always correct, but if a "high speed" ferry left Portland just before Sunset in August and arrived Yarmouth well after sunrise, then we were on "The Cat" and my father just called it the "Blue Nose" - he bought the tickets...One ride on that big ol' stink pot was enough for me...I remember wondering if the "new" catamaran was a nicer boat... On subsequent trips we sheltered at the Fundy National Park. Those were great rides. felt like a 20 degree lean into the wind on Canso Causeway, just to maintain a straight line! Eyes popping at the sight of what looked like surf coming of the tops of the 18-wheelers coming at us.... I believe I was on my Royal Star, so it would have been around the year 2000.

Rob,
If you throw a 4mm, T handle, hex into your bags, I think the seat removal is fairly easy...I've done it several times trying to chase down antenna issues... (weak FM reception and poor CB Tx.) If you do it a couple times at home, it should be a breeze (lol) on a boat. Especially, if you have a passenger to whom you can pass the screws and the side plates as you remove them.
Thank you, I will give it a shot.
 

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Thank you, I appreciate the suggestion!!
You are welcome, so basically six straps are needed if you use the passenger foot rest and front forks. Also I forgot to mentioned I also used a few rags to protect any place the strap or metal hook could come in contact with any part of the bike.
Good luck. Enjoy.
 

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putting the strap over the seat and pulling it tight on both ends on the deck will not work.

Picture doing that with a rope, and in place of the seat there is a pulley, as you lean the bike from left to right the rope goes over the pulley, and the bike is fully free to fall over either way.

Ok.. replace the pulley with your seat - now all you have is the surface friction of the strap touching the seat - not a lot of force there, no matter how hard you pull the strap tight.

You need a strap on the left side in a solid connection with the frame somewhere to keep the bike from moving at all to the right, and another strap on the right side to the deck. Both must be connected to the bike, not looped over it, and not wrapped around anything.

I learned this the hard way going on a camping trip with a sea-bag on my passenger seat. I had bungee cords and ropes going over the bag from one side to the other (like your proposed straps going over the seat), but there was nothing stopping the bag from rolling right and left under the straps.

I had to stop twice with in 10 miles from home, the bag kept rolling to one side or the other - I kept pulling the straps tighter, to no avail. I had to take all the straps and ropes off and start over, using the handle in the middle of the bag as an anchor point.

strapping stuff solidly to a motorcycle and strapping down a motorcycle is easy, but there are wrong ways to do it that look like they are secure, until the suspension compresses a tiny bit on a bounce, and the bike falls over.
 

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Discussion Starter #18 (Edited)
putting the strap over the seat and pulling it tight on both ends on the deck will not work.

Picture doing that with a rope, and in place of the seat there is a pulley, as you lean the bike from left to right the rope goes over the pulley, and the bike is fully free to fall over either way.

Ok.. replace the pulley with your seat - now all you have is the surface friction of the strap touching the seat - not a lot of force there, no matter how hard you pull the strap tight.

You need a strap on the left side in a solid connection with the frame somewhere to keep the bike from moving at all to the right, and another strap on the right side to the deck. Both must be connected to the bike, not looped over it, and not wrapped around anything.

I learned this the hard way going on a camping trip with a sea-bag on my passenger seat. I had bungee cords and ropes going over the bag from one side to the other (like your proposed straps going over the seat), but there was nothing stopping the bag from rolling right and left under the straps.

I had to stop twice with in 10 miles from home, the bag kept rolling to one side or the other - I kept pulling the straps tighter, to no avail. I had to take all the straps and ropes off and start over, using the handle in the middle of the bag as an anchor point.

strapping stuff solidly to a motorcycle and strapping down a motorcycle is easy, but there are wrong ways to do it that look like they are secure, until the suspension compresses a tiny bit on a bounce, and the bike falls over.
Thanks....makes a lot of sense .....I did not think of that. My Roadstar was simple to strap down so much open metal. I got a private message suggesting that I can buy straps specifically for the grips from Amazon and he has used it on a SVTC and it worked well. So I am thinking of buying those combined with a strap around the rear wheel to simply stopping it from moving forward thereby reducing the slack on the straps around the grips. This should result in the straps not coming in contact with any fiberglass part, I will look at the bike again tonight.

I appreciate everyone's help.
 
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