Yamaha Starbike Forum banner

1 - 20 of 26 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I rode a 50+ mile ride last week.

This may very well be a confession of my own wussyness - and if so mea culpa - but my right hand was numb and unhappy constantly attached to the throttle.

It occurred to me that said hand would be happier with a cruise control unit.

Have any of you added a cruise control unit? How well is it working for you and how does it look?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
I rode a 50+ mile ride last week.

This may very well be a confession of my own wussyness - and if so mea culpa - but my right hand was numb and unhappy constantly attached to the throttle.

It occurred to me that said hand would be happier with a cruise control unit.

Have any of you added a cruise control unit? How well is it working for you and how does it look?

A true electronic cruise control is available as an outsource aftermarket item (I think the supplier is actually in Australia). When I looked at them they ran about $1200 USD.

Some folks have added the friction lock types and the reviews are mixed. I've avoided them because various forum threads are replete with sad tales of gloves, fingers, cuffs, etc. hooking on them at the most inopportune times resulting in either runaway or "all stop" conditions. And of course the friction types don't compensate for grades.

Without passing any sort of judgement, perhaps a better investment might be a wrist brace? Most hand discomfort is due to over-tight tight grip, loss of circulation due to elbow/shoulder position and vibration transmitted through the grips. Some of that can be alleviated with ISO type grips and comfortable gloves. Two years ago a friend gave me a pair of John Deere leather gloves that are the most comfortable summer motorcycle gloves I've ever owned.

But as I recall, you're experienced and working to modify your handlebar pullback so you probably know all of this.

Good luck in your research:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,452 Posts
www.crampbuster.com/I use a cramp buster or throttle boss. They are cheap and functional.It lets the outter pad of your palm rest on it so you don't have to squeeze the grip so tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I appreciate your advice and find it very useful. I've thought about investing in a better pair of gloves. And I'm not about to spend $1,200 on a cruise unit.

But the way you end kind of sounds like I've seriously pissed you off somehow:

But as I recall, you're experienced and working to modify your handlebar pullback so you probably know all of this.
For the record, I think I've been rather clear: I rode a motorcycle for six years TWENTY YEARS AGO. I've NEVER put on hoity toity airs about my being "experienced." I can document on this very forum that I have done anything BUT boast about my "experience." And I frankly have no idea whatsoever why you would characterize me that way.

Furthermore, I didn't "work" to modify ANYTHING on the bike I bought. It CAME with a set of mini-apehangers. I didn't put the dang things on; the previous owner did. And my crime was that I rode the bike and liked them enough that I didn't want to go through half a day of rewiring the stock bars to put them back on the bike. If doing absolutely nothing is what you mean by my "working to modify your handlebar pullback," I guess I have to stand guilty as charged.

All that said, those twenty years ago when I last rode, I put a very cheap cruise control unit on my bike. Somehow I avoided total disaster with it. Maybe that's because I was so "experienced" or something.

I actually appreciate the advice you gave. Maybe a good set of the right kind of gloves would take care of my issue. I wouldn't care that much if a cruise unit lost some speed over time and that sort of thing, because all I'm really looking for is something to avoid experiencing "the Claw" syndrome. And I wouldn't want to add something that would look crappy on an otherwise beautiful bike if I could make things better with the right set of gloves.

I'm not here to start pissing contests. I have liked this forum and received a lot of excellent advice - including right here. But I'm also not here to be ridiculed. Especially if the person doing said ridiculing is asserting stuff about me that isn't even correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,452 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Hdeater,

That crampbuster thing looks pretty good. They sell them on Amazon -

[ame]http://www.amazon.com/CrampBuster-Throttle-Mounted-Motorcycle-Cruise/dp/B000NUVPQA[/ame]

- and they ARE cheap.

That might be the "wrist brace" that Springer was talking about. I'm not sure.

Between the "comfortable gloves" that gadget, I think that would go a long way toward a more comfortable ride.

Thank you very much for the link to the $330 cruise kit. I would go for the crampbuster first, and only think about the cruise unit if it didn't work for me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,452 Posts
I thought about the cruise kit but I don't do enough hwy flying to justify it.The cramp buster gets me by for a whole lot less.But on the other hand who can really justify any of our mods we do. Hell I spent over 300 for my exhaust and had a perfectly good one on the bike. You know what I mean.It's all in what you want to make your bike your own.Sounds like a star commercial.lol
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I spent all my free money on the bike. And actually spent more than I'd budgeted (especially considering that I'm going to still have to buy a windshield for this bike).

I would rather start cheap and work my way up in regards to cruise assistance devices.

And frankly I don't know HOW much highway riding I'll end up doing.

I know what you mean about mods. I'm planning to get a Stratoliner shield ASAP. And then I thought a driver backrest would be really nice. And then I saw somebody with highway pegs on their crash bars and thought that might be nice. And then I decided I needed a little help with some kind of cruise assist. And then ...?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,452 Posts
Just make the voices go away.I tell ya it don't stop.But it so much fun.I've had my bike since June of 09 and it does take time to add changes to the bike unless your loaded with a nice bank roll.I think we all kinda do it on a budget.It seems more rewarding that way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
122 Posts
I'd side with the crampbuster idea. It's cheap, it's simple, and it works. The other side of things might be the grips. Do they fit your hands the right way? Would it be better if you went with something a little thicker, or with more padding?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
But the way you end kind of sounds like I've seriously pissed you off somehow:

Good heavens!! You got that from my thinking you were experienced?:eek:

Not at all. I was trying to walk back the impression that I was "talking down" to you by mentioning basics like gloves and riding position.

I'd thought that on an earlier thread you'd mentioned something about adding risers or changing the pullback on your handlebars and those are things people do who have some experience in the saddle.

My apologies for the miscommunication.:(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
166 Posts
+1 on the brakeaway!
Have had mine for a few years and it is the BEST!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Good heavens!! You got that from my thinking you were experienced?:eek:

Not at all. I was trying to walk back the impression that I was "talking down" to you by mentioning basics like gloves and riding position.

I'd thought that on an earlier thread you'd mentioned something about adding risers or changing the pullback on your handlebars and those are things people do who have some experience in the saddle.

My apologies for the miscommunication.:(
You have my apologies for reading you the wrong way. If you'd been commenting on my inexperience, it wouldn't have bothered me in the slightest. After twenty years out of motorcycling, I AM inexperienced and think of myself that way. My former motorcycling days frankly seem like another world to me now.

I've been asking VERY basic questions, and still have more to ask.

I interpreted the previous sentence I quoted from you as basically not only calling me out on inexperience, but as essentially labelling me as an arrogant fool who thought he knew everything but was actually stupidly screwing up his own bike and causing his own problems. I was thinking, "What on earth did I do to this guy?"

I'm sorry to have so misread your intent, and I'm very happy to have been wrong at the same time.

At this point, my bike is EXACTLY as I bought it. And the ONLY thing the previous owner did was install the mini-apes. There are no risers.

When I looked at the pictures of the bike (for sale), I assumed I would hate the apes and change them back to the stock bars. But the owner - when I told him I'm 6'1" just like he is - assured me I would love them. He had me sit on the bike and put the stock wheelbarrow bars up to compare the two bars. The mini-apes were only a couple of inches taller and a couple of inches narrower. I liked the feel of the mini-apes. And since you've got to take off the headlight and route all the wiring through the bars, I decided to keep them as they were.

The riding position with the mini-apes feels very comfortable and natural. My hands are about 3-4" below my shoulder level, with my elbows being slightly bent. I can either lean back in the seat and cruise or sit forward and duck my head for reduced wind resistance with equal ease.

I read quite a few reviews of the Roadliner, and the only two things that got attacked by the reviewers was the bars and the seat. So the fact that I actually really liked the feel of the mini-ape position and the fact that the stock bars had been panned by almost every reviewer made plus the fact that it was a PITA to change the bars made me keep it the way I bought it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
http://www.brakeawayproducts.com/appguide-5CP02.php?make_id=7&model_id=36

I got a brakeaway cruise on mine, and it works pretty well... It releases as soon as you tap the front brake lever.
+1 on the brakeaway!
Have had mine for a few years and it is the BEST!
I'd side with the crampbuster idea. It's cheap, it's simple, and it works. The other side of things might be the grips. Do they fit your hands the right way? Would it be better if you went with something a little thicker, or with more padding?
I think I'd start with Hdeater's crampuster plus a better set of gloves and work my way from there (fwiw, my current "motorcycle gloves" are a set of Mechanix gloves. They have the advantage of being XXL and fitting over my very large hand. But they aren't padded, or contoured, etc.

I'd like to get a Strato shield and a backrest before messing with a real cruise control anyway, and sometimes minimal fixes work the best anyway.

I AM interested in this brakeaway unit, though.

Do you guys have a pic of the unit on your Road/Stratoliners? I opened 08 Midnight's link, but frankly couldn't visualize what the unit looked like and how it functioned.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
At this point, my bike is EXACTLY as I bought it. And the ONLY thing the previous owner did was install the mini-apes. There are no risers.
:)

I would offer the following for your consideration. As I think (thought?) I'd mentioned in your "welcome aboard" the most significant things I did to perfect the endurance comfort of my bike were to install the Star Touring handlebars (which accomplish the same thing as your mini-apes) Kuryakyn ISO grips, and a magnificent Ultimate Mid-Rider seat. The synergism of those three things (and my John Deere gloves:D) made 400 mile touring days much easier on my 6'1" ancient frame.

A comparison between the OEM seat and Ultimate:



The touring handlebars were a $170 hit; Kuryakyn grips $75; Ultimate Mid $315.

Good luck in your search for Nirvana:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
So far I haven't had any "monkey butt" issues with the stock seat. At this point, I'm planning on keeping it, but DO want to get a driver backrest.

The guy I bought the bike from suggested that the better way to go was to get a particular type of foam (sorry, but the type escapes me right now) and have a shop re-do the stock seat instead.

It is possible I could change my mind on the seat. When I go to visit my brother in Simi Valley (a little over two hours away), I would probably know for sure how good or bad the stock seat is on my backside.

On the 60 mile trips I've taken, the only thing I've noticed is "the claw" feeling I've had on the throttle.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,741 Posts
The guy I bought the bike from suggested that the better way to go was to get a particular type of foam (sorry, but the type escapes me right now) and have a shop re-do the stock seat instead.
I would respectfully offer a consideration with regard to re-working your seat (based on a personally experienced incident).

When you have a seat re-done, most reputable shops will tailor it to your weight, height, inseam and riding position. Exactly what you want, eh? But... It's not what the next owner of the bike will want (unless he/she is a twin) and may actually decrease the resale/trade value of your bike and make it harder to sell/trade.

In my own case I purchased a Mustang Regal seat for my 1100 Shadow. When I traded it for a Wing and the dealer found out I still had the OEM seat, he insisted I reinstall it for the transaction and I had to peddle the Mustang on eBay (at a loss, naturally:()

Just a thought.

As to "monkey butt", that will occur regardless of seat if you ride long enough. Regular rest stops and medicated body powders are the topical treatment to delay its onset.

Most folks change seats first and foremost because the thigh and buttocks pressure points become unbearably painful over long hauls, and can actually cause nerve damage. But in addition to leg/buttock health and comfort considerations, the seat also determines your upper back/shoulder/neck/arm riding position and associated stresses. That's why I mentioned the synergistic effect of touring handlebars with greater height and pullback, the larger diameter but softer ISO grips, and the seat itself.

You may be one of those fortunate people who only need a minor tweak to achieve your long distance riding comfort; for the sake of your wallet I hope so:). But over time I think you'll probably use a combination of modifications to make your bike fit you properly and reduce stresses in your hands, arms, legs and torso.

And time will also be one of those "modifications". You mention that you're back in the saddle after an intermission. In that scenario, there is often a tendency to apply more grip than is necessary until you feel more confidence in yourself and the bike. That "power grip" becomes an extended isometric exercise and fatigue will rapidly set in. Keep telling yourself to relax.

In any case, good luck.:)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
You mention that you're back in the saddle after an intermission. In that scenario, there is often a tendency to apply more grip than is necessary until you feel more confidence in yourself and the bike. That "power grip" becomes an extended isometric exercise and fatigue will rapidly set in. Keep telling yourself to relax.
For the official record, I am the Starfish from "Fining Nemo":


It may very well be that after a few more rides I'll "loosen up" and my "the claw" hand issue will go away on at least shorter trips (as in "60 mile" short).

I'm not likely to do extended touring on this bike. I CAN imagine doing a trip that would involve a six hour ride maybe once a year.

I see what you're saying in reference to the seat; if I re-do the stock seat, I may need to ultimately buy another stock seat. Versus buying an after-market and already having the unmodified stock seat.

So far I'm happy with the seat, but then again I've only gone on a few sixty mile rides, and my "the claw" hand has occupied my attention rather than any "monkey butt" I may have been feeling.

I have been thinking about that crampbuster, and it has occurred to me that while it would probably help out on a long highway trip, the dang thing could be dangerous in other driving conditions. It looks like it would be easy to give your bike WAY more throttle than you want at a bad time with one of those things on. Is that an issue?

I also looked into the ISO grips (and found some interesting stuff on this forum). Quite a few people haven't liked them, or have found them to not last very long, or bitched about how they have a tendency to turn your hands/gloves black, etc. There's apparently another maker (I remember "Avon" or something like that) with a good set of grips.

I would want anything I spent good money on to last. That's the way I'm wired.

The electronic cruise control unit someone linked to remains a tempting idea. But I'll wait on that until after I've bought things like the shield and the backrest and gloves and a few other pieces of bike candy.
 
1 - 20 of 26 Posts
Top