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1998 Yamaha V Star 650 classic
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Discussion Starter #21 (Edited)
Hey, let’s take a vote and don’t worry you don’t have to send your ballot through the mail!:ROFLMAO: Should I use loctite on the coil or not? What’s your thoughts? Also, when I scrapped off the old gasket I put micro scratches on the aluminum. Should I use gasket maker to help seal it up?
 

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2011 Yamaha VStar 650
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441 Posts
Loctite on the helicoil? Not needed...
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
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10,140 Posts
No locktite on helicoil,

Yes, small, very small amount of RTV on gasket

97983
 

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1998 Yamaha V Star 650 classic
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18 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
I MANAGED TO MAKE IT WORSE! So I screwed up first by stretching the heli coil, then I drilled it out and retapped it. I managed to get the coil in like it’s supposed to be. Well when I popped the tang off the first time I hit it too damn hard and busted the metal backing on the hole and got shavings blown inside the crank. So I am now screwed. I hope someone in the future reads this and saves themselves from this disaster. I’m not sure if I can disassemble the gears and JB weld the hole or if I’m so screwed I need a new crank. Since I’m quarantined because my kids friend has the corona I’ve got nothing but time on my hands
 

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2005 V-Star 1100 Classic
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1,322 Posts
That's a bummer Jason. I believe that tapped hole was a blind hole, so are you saying you punched through the bottom of the hole into the crankcase? You said "shavings blown inside the crank". Do you shavings into the crankcase? Where the oil goes? The "crank", meaning the crankshaft, isn't hollow, so I think you mean into the crankcase.

So assuming I am correct about that, two issues.

1. Shavings need to be cleaned out of the crankcase before they are washed around into places where they would cause wear. I will guess you don't want to disassemble the engine. Aluminum chips are light and easily washed around, so consider using kerosene or diesel fuel to flood the crankcase, with the drain plug removed, followed by compressed air. You can probably get most of it to float out the drain. Those solvents are decent lubricants, so there is little danger to using them It is an old timers trick for cleaning old engines. They would even run the engines with that, sometimes ATF also, but I would not do that in your case. Best not to allow the oil pump to move anything around. Just follow that up with a flood of oil through the crankcase, and out the drain, which will carry the solvents out. Then add oil and run the bike, change the oil in about an hour of run time. THIS IS A HACK! Recognize it as a hack, and decide for yourself if it is worth avoiding a tear down, or possibly damaging the engine.

2. You've still got to fix that hole. Hard to give advice since I don't know hole depth, or how much meat is left around it, etc. Remember above I told you the heli-coil was a one-time thing and not to screw it up? Possible fix is to insert a short set screw at the bottom of the hole, permanent loctite in place. Can't tell you if there is enough meat to do that. Maybe a second heli-coil deeper for the set screw, and another at normal depth for the original bolt. If you do end up taking the engine apart, then there are other possibilities to save the block, including welding an aluminum plug in place.
 
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Have you looked into using an ez loc solid wall threaded insert? Similar to a helicoil but slightly different But for sure I would get any metal shrapnel out of the engine before going much further. Google ez loc and see if that may help you out.
 
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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
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We have all had mishaps with doing a repair. Don't get down on yourself. Flush all shavings out as @bpounds explained. It will be time consuming but will get most shavings out. As far as repairing the hole, plug the end of it. Mix up a small amount of Kwik JB weld or similar product. Use something like a q-tip stick and push some in the hole. Not a whole lot, just enough to seal it. Run your screw in, leave in for a few seconds and then remove it. Now, go watch a good movie or spend several hours on the forum reading to let the epoxy harden. Then put it all back together and you are good. You got this!
 

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1998 Yamaha V Star 650 classic
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Discussion Starter #29
I apologize for the late response. I’ve been sick past few days. I took some pictures to give a better idea of what’s going on. You can see light at the other end of the hole. Based on its location and my marvelous fubar the only way I can see to adequately and carefully put jbweld on the backside of the hole is to remove the clutch assembly. I have the repair manual but what I don’t know is if this tear down and rebuild is in my wheel house. I also managed to get a large piece of metal in the hole at the bottom of the oil pump. So any recommendations are much appreciated.
@bpounds yeah I remember you saying it was a one time thing. And I had that running through my head the whole time. Lol. Oh well.
@Redbird58 the ez loc is a good idea. I didn’t bottom out the helicoil (the second heli coil that was done right) so I don’t have enough threadsto bottom it out.
@lesblank thanks for your words of encouragement. I think @bpounds idea of flushing is great should I disassemble the clutch assembly to put JBWeld on the back or shove some in the hole. I think I should mention the chain is right behind this and getting JBWeld on it would obviously make this worse. Thanks for the advice
 

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I suggest doing as Les said... Mix JB weld quick and then put it into the hole using a qtip or something similar you could then run a bolt down the hole to push the JB into position. You could grease the bolt up a little to ensure that it doesn't stick to the JB weld.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
Bikes done. Finally. So I decided to go against every recommendation of Not taking off the clutch and gear and did it anyway. In retrospect I’m glad I did because there was a ton of metal shavings on the back of the clutch basket as well as the gears. When I used the jb weld to repair the hole it didn’t. I was able to flick it off with my finger nail. I used the jbweld putty and it worked like a charm. I also put Barnett clutch springs on instead of the factory ones.
 

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That is great Jason, I am real glad to hear it is back on the road, enjoy ride.......... (y) 😎
 
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