Yamaha Starbike Forum banner

1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Does the size of the fuel tank (17 Liter) include the reserve?

Manual says 17 liter tank and 4.5 liter reserve, so not sure if that means the main tank is 12.5 liters.

Picking up my bike this week and just trying to figure out the range before I hit reserve.

I'm in Canada. Am I going to get around 250kms before hitting reserve and then an additional 50 or so kms on reserve?
 

·
Super Moderator "Loose Nut"
Joined
·
5,397 Posts
The 17 liter is total. I'm in the US so use to gallon. On my 1100, I set trip meter everytime I fill up. Start looking for gas at the 100 mile mark. It will easily go 120 miles before I need to switch to reserve. I do a lot of city driving so my mileage is normally lower than most, throttle hand might also come into play. The reserve is right at 1 gallon, so to be safe get gas within 30 miles after switching. I hate pushing my bike so I'm always conservative on getting fuel.

Fuel Tank Capacity - Regular & Reserve:

Fuel tank capacity: 17.0 L (4.49 US gal) (3.74 Imp.gal)
Fuel reserve amount: 4.5 L (1.19 US gal) (0.99 Imp.gal)

Rounds out to: 3.3 gal main, plus 1.2 gal reserve for total of 4.5 gal (US gal)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
The 17 liter is total. I'm in the US so use to gallon. On my 1100, I set trip meter everytime I fill up. Start looking for gas at the 100 mile mark. It will easily go 120 miles before I need to switch to reserve. I do a lot of city driving so my mileage is normally lower than most, throttle hand might also come into play. The reserve is right at 1 gallon, so to be safe get gas within 30 miles after switching. I hate pushing my bike so I'm always conservative on getting fuel.

Fuel Tank Capacity - Regular & Reserve:

Fuel tank capacity: 17.0 L (4.49 US gal) (3.74 Imp.gal)
Fuel reserve amount: 4.5 L (1.19 US gal) (0.99 Imp.gal)

Rounds out to: 3.3 gal main, plus 1.2 gal reserve for total of 4.5 gal (US gal)
Thanx for the good info
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
147 Posts
My 650 has 16l total with 3 L reserve and I usually get 230 km per tank running around 90 kph to 100 kph mostly flat roads - you should expect around the same - initially when I got the bike I rode it until the engine quit and then switched to reserve - really the only way to check your limits - you might want to try that at 120 kpm because it will use fuel more at that speed - but that's only really needed if you're doing a lot of highway riding.
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,482 Posts
I'm in Canada too but I have an American bike. The furthest I've gone before switching to reserve is 142 miles, but I've had to switch at 120 before too. It's short range is one of my pet peeves about it (the others being the oil filter and oil sight glass), but I usually run around 70-75 mph on the highway so that might have something to do with it. And since I know how far I can go I just set the trip meter and start planning for a fuel stop after I pass 100 miles. It's really only been a PITA during group rides (got separated last summer while searching for a gas station).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
Finally had a nice day for biking. Did approx 400 kms through Eastern Ontario backroads. Saw a huge moose in Algonquin Park.

According to my calculations my 2007 1100 Classic, which is completely stock gets about 20km / liter. This is on secondary hwy's with posted speeds of 80 kph and I was doing about 90 - 100 kph. So that works out to about 240 kms before reserve which is right on par with what everyone else seems to be getting.

Sure is a great bike. Starts and runs perfect and has plenty or torque. I find the stock pipes sound just right. Not overly loud but can hear them well at hwy speeds without causing me to go deaf.
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator "Loose Nut"
Joined
·
5,397 Posts
Sounds like you had a great ride. Now that you know a mileage when you switch to reserve just set your trip meter and you will always know when to get gas. I normally star looking about 20 miles early so I'm not caught off guard. That moose looked to big to make mad. 😀
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
39 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Sounds like you had a great ride. Now that you know a mileage when you switch to reserve just set your trip meter and you will always know when to get gas. I normally star looking about 20 miles early so I'm not caught off guard. That moose looked to big to make mad. 😀
Rodger That, Thanx:smile:
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,482 Posts
Those are big critters. I was driving my 18 wheeler down a two lane highway through the middle of nowhere one winter and I came upon a bull and cow standing in the road. Because of the snowbanks they didn't jump right into the woods and trotted down the road ahead of me. I rolled along behind them for a bit and when they moved to one side I slowly pulled past. Their heads were level with my side window.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
296 Posts
Nice bike and thanks for sharing your ride today! Great pics of moose!!! Good to know how far you can travel when the tank gets low? Have travelled in Quebec and Ontario (not on MC) but driving large van hauling 3 tier canoe trailer finding few gas stations along our journey. But planned routes so knew where I needed to
refill.
Thanks for sharing on forum.
Ride safe and enjoy~YammyV
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
312 Posts
Finally had a nice day for biking. Did approx 400 kms through Eastern Ontario backroads. Saw a huge moose in Algonquin Park.

According to my calculations my 2007 1100 Classic, which is completely stock gets about 20km / liter. This is on secondary hwy's with posted speeds of 80 kph and I was doing about 90 - 100 kph. So that works out to about 240 kms before reserve which is right on par with what everyone else seems to be getting.

Sure is a great bike. Starts and runs perfect and has plenty or torque. I find the stock pipes sound just right. Not overly loud but can hear them well at hwy speeds without causing me to go deaf.
Great looking bike and I concur on the milage. Mine gets similar distance.

Regarding the moose, and old man story: In '74 while stationed at Ellsworth AFB in South Dakota, we would go on dispatch's for maintenance on the Minuteman III missiles scattered all over the countryside on the high plains. They were 150 to 300 miles from base with 10 miles in-between each missile so if one had a direct hit, the others would remain intact. If we had problems and our job went over 20 hours, they sometimes choppered a relief team out and chopper us back to the base. There were a few times the pilot would see some Elk and go down to buzz them, I'm sure that scared the holy you know what out of them but as a 21 year old, it was pretty cool. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,634 Posts
^ the Australian Army wanted to modify the helicopter flight simulators they use to train pilots for the unique situations they encounter in Australia.

For example, if there is a large number of Kangaroos in an open area, and you fly by, they will be startled and all run off. They can give away the position of the helicopter if an enemy sees them running off. So they wanted their flight simulator modified to include herds of Kangaroos.

It would have been a lot of SW programming to start from scratch. The programmers decided that infantry act the same way, if a helicopter flew by they would all run for cover. So they just took the model for a soldier and put a Kangaroo appearance on it.

When the pilots tried the simulator, the Kangaroos would all scurry away, but then they would take cover and start shooting at them.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
312 Posts
^ the Australian Army wanted to modify the helicopter flight simulators they use to train pilots for the unique situations they encounter in Australia.

For example, if there is a large number of Kangaroos in an open area, and you fly by, they will be startled and all run off. They can give away the position of the helicopter if an enemy sees them running off. So they wanted their flight simulator modified to include herds of Kangaroos.

It would have been a lot of SW programming to start from scratch. The programmers decided that infantry act the same way, if a helicopter flew by they would all run for cover. So they just took the model for a soldier and put a Kangaroo appearance on it.

When the pilots tried the simulator, the Kangaroos would all scurry away, but then they would take cover and start shooting at them.
Those damn Kangaroo's... That's funny!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Those are big critters. I was driving my 18 wheeler down a two lane highway through the middle of nowhere one winter and I came upon a bull and cow standing in the road. Because of the snowbanks they didn't jump right into the woods and trotted down the road ahead of me. I rolled along behind them for a bit and when they moved to one side I slowly pulled past. Their heads were level with my side window.
Didn't realize you were a "driver" too, Northern! :grin: I been spendin' too much time in my ol' Mack lately.

Sorry for wandering off topic. That's a good lookin' 1100 you've got, 17A
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
2,482 Posts
I was a driver - now I just shunt containers around the rail yard. Had enough.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
421 Posts
It's been my observation that almost all motorcycles have a fuel range of about 125 miles to reserve. The range varies from about 100 miles to about 150. Bigger bikes have bigger tanks and burn more fuel. The only bike I ever owned with better range was a 2007 Ninja 250, which would run about 225 miles to reserve. Even my KLR650 would not make 200 miles to reserve.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top