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Any suggestions on models and sources?
 

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the ones that have the bar that deflects as the wrench is loaded up are highly reliable

but the ones you set to a number and it clicks in your hand when you reach the torque setting are much easier to use - you dont have to look at the wrench while using it

Ive never heard of any name brand being better than any other. The stuff from Harbor Freight is better than nothing

but like all your tools, get the best one you can find, and your grand children will think of you every time they use it 80 years from nowd

also when you are working on any machine and its late and you are exhausted, the last thing you want is a tool that fails on you
 

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I have a set of Craftsman torque clicker wrenches in 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 in. Been using them for years. Watch for sales, best time to pick them up. I'll agree, any torque wrench is better than non.

91991
 

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Agree with Les, my dad used Craftsman, loved em. Me i went HF, they're a little tricky ..have to learn how to feel the click, markings are hard to read. But I really liked the price! I borrow a digital [email protected] every year or two and compare it with mine to "check calibration" haven't failed yet... Happy wrenching. Using torque wrench (examples are HF)
 

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Don't know if you have shopped Craftsman recently but it aint what it used to be.

Most of my tools are Craftsman. Most are over 40 years old. That's when Craftsman was good.
Went looking for a mobile tool cabinet the other day. Craftsman was about the poorest made out of all the cabinets I saw.

As for torque wrenches I have the harbor freight. I have not checked the accuracy of them. Even if they were as much as 10 percent inaccurate, (which I seriously doubt) would it really make that much difference?
 

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Poser, you are right about Craftsman, they sold out. Also correct, I don't care if the wrench is ten percent off. I just check so I'm not 50 percent wrong. Gotta use the one you trust..enough. Having stripped out studs on engine blocks, guessing, I do use one now...
 

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I just picked up Pittsburgh 1/2" and 3/8" drive from harbor freight for $9.99 each. They have a lifetime warranty and are certified to 0.4% . They had a sidewalk sale fri-sun Regularly $19.99
 

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The Harbour freight ones work just fine but with all measuring tools please use your best judgment as bolts and nuts can still break and or become stripped. As any steel bolt going in to aluminum cases and different metal. Like the drain plugs and spark plugs. As the most important part of tourq is that all bolts and nuts are equally tight and uniform in tightness.
 

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I have a set of Craftsman torque clicker wrenches in 1/4, 3/8 and 1/2 in. Been using them for years. Watch for sales, best time to pick them up. I'll agree, any torque wrench is better than non.

View attachment 91991
I have that wrench and could never figure out how to set / read the darn thing. I may have to re-address that and do some homework, even though the 'that feels tight enough' and the 'don't go tighter than that' settings in my head seem to work out ok.
 

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that feels tight enough' and the 'don't go tighter than that' settings in my head seem to work out o
I have found through experience that the guy sitting on your shoulder whispering those words to you as you are tightening things up is right most of the time! 😀 Ignore him at your own peril!
 

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I have that wrench and could never figure out how to set / read the darn thing. I may have to re-address that and do some homework, even though the 'that feels tight enough' and the 'don't go tighter than that' settings in my head seem to work out ok.
Most of the torque wrenches you just have to move the lock buy pushing it forward to release the handle to spin it left or right depending on higher or lower torque that you desire. You will need to make sure that the lock seats back into the right position and when you are done using it reset to a lower level makes them last longer.
 

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this has come up in other threads but since we are talking torque:

if you lube the bolt or nut it changes the torque - the lube lets the torque pull the bolt/stud more (more stretch) than you would get with dry metal to metal

I use to put antiseize on the lug nuts of my cars, and I was so proud of myself for doing it, then torqued them to 90 ft lbs (spec)

the lug nuts on all my cars got harder and harder to spin off over the years - turns out if you put anti seize on them they should only be torqued to about 60 ft lbs

to be clear: when you torque a bolt or stud, it stretches like a spring - the steel deforms and that is what is applying pressure (force) to the two mating surfaces and holding it together.. If a bolt has 20 threads to an inch, when you put 90 lbs of torque on it, with no rotational friction that is mulitiplied about 20 times, so there is 1800 lbs of force pulling that lug nut against the two surfaces you are bolting together (like the wheel of your car to the brake rotor).

when you torque steel into steel too much, the bolt/stud stretches past its limit to return, and it is permanently deformed. That is why you need a torque wrench in the first place

but the lube variable is hard to pin down to a simple percent reduction. For example, when you change your oil, the oil drain hole and plug are going to have oil on them - it would be impossible to wash that down with alcohol and get it to dry metal to metal, so I have to assume the torque spec for the drain plug is already reduced knowing the connection will be lubed

like wise when you rebuild an engine, you lube all the parts as you put it together

but for things like the oil filter cover.. those bolts will get some oil on them... so reduce the torque to 67%?

obviously things like axle nuts are dry - so DONT lube those with antiseize and then crank it down to the torque spec in the manual

this is one of those things you only learn from experience - I never see anything in factory service manuals that call out DRY or WET torque specs.
 

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Most of the torque wrenches you just have to move the lock buy pushing it forward to release the handle to spin it left or right depending on higher or lower torque that you desire. You will need to make sure that the lock seats back into the right position and when you are done using it reset to a lower level makes them last longer.

the instructions for my torque wrenches says to spin the setting back down past zero after you use it

apparently leaving it set causes the accuracy to drift over time (if you put it in your tool box till next time....)

the other thing to be aware of is many wrenches have ft-lbs on one side, and newton meters N-M on the other

if you are wrenching down and its not clicking when you think it should, and the little voice in your head is saying NO NO NO NO NO!

make sure you did not set it with the wrong scale - they are WAY different from each other
 

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Lucky for me is my scales are right across from each other but still double check the setting before you continue with tightening any bolt or nuts. Also know that you can’t do rolling torque with a click style wrench.
 
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