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Hey Venture/Eluder riders, I joined over the weekend and tried to post my test ride impressions of the new Venture Transcontinental, but somehow missed the fact that I had to post in the New Member area first before it would let me post here...duh on my part. Now that I’ve been certified that I’m not Spam, a robot, or a Spambot, let the fun begin!

I joined this forum as it seems more active for the new bike, which is good. Below is what I intended to post on Saturday, I hope it helps anyone on the fence.

Greetings Venture riders,
I’m 49 years old, my wife, kids and I live in Colorado Springs, and I’m currently riding my beloved Honda ST1300 I bought new in 2003. Other than having to replace the fuel pump last summer, it has been really reliable, but I’ve been wanting a touring bike with more comfort. Below is a quick list of what I tried before the Venture Transcontinental:

1. 2017 HD Ultra Limited- Liked the new motor, good handling, great paint and chrome, but I felt cramped (5’10 with long legs), the suspension still needs more travel, and the tranny to primary fluid transfer issue concerned me. It may be resolved now as I haven’t followed their forums in a while.

2. 2018 BMW K1600 GTL- Great handling and brakes, smooth motor, good storage, but felt cramped again, the torque comes on too high in the RPM range for my liking, and the valve adjustments are expensive. I know there are highway pegs available and the Grand America has “footrest plates,” but still not really my cup of tea. Would love to have a new R1200 GSA LC to go with a new touring bike, though:wink:

3. 2018 Goldwing Tour (ST on steroids)- Lighter, more comfortable than previous gens (for me, especially with highway pegs), new motor is good, 6 speed manual and power windshield (finally), but less fuel capacity (more efficient but range stays the same), less storage, and not impressed with the new suspension. Felt numb up front and a little harsh on the rear, but it’s probably rider preference. Some like it, while others are going with a Traxxion upgrade. I would have to upgrade if I bought one.

4. 2017 Indian Roadmaster- My favorite until today. Great handling, styling (to me), paint and chrome, good brakes, comfortable for me (especially with highway pegs), great stereo and nav system, easy to maintain, but heat can be an issue. This is mitigated with new headers, exhaust and tune, but yes, it’s more money to do that. It does help though. I rode a Chieftain with their 116 upgrade kit (right before the stop sale) and Freedom headers/True duals, and I never felt any heat on a warm day. It went like stink for a bike in this category, too!:grin:

Then I got a chance to ride a new Raspberry metallic Venture Transcontinental demo in Denver last Saturday. I’ve liked the looks of this bike since it came out. The front (love the headlights), back, and side profile are very destinctive. It’s different in a good way, and sets it apart from the crowd. It’s also forging its own styling, and not trying to be something else.

The dealer let me go alone and where ever I wanted, so I took the same 14 mile route the Indian demo rides go on to compare the ride to the Roadmaster. Right off the bat I was impressed with the slow speed stability, and was blown away with how easy it made a tight u turn with little counterweight necessary. The power in Touring mode was decent and about what the Indian is, but Sport mode woke it up nicely. The pick up was stronger, and I never hit the rev limiter in first or second like some have complained. I found myself naturally shifting before it, even when accelerating hard. The torque sweet spot is much lower, anyway. I think some of those riders aren’t familiar with how to ride a v twin, and the Indian and HD redlines aren’t too far from there either.

Let me say that I’m not expecting this bike to be a drag racer, but I’m of the mindset that more power is better than less, especially when passing or avoiding distracted drivers. It also helps when riding at altitude in the Rockies.

On my way back to the dealership I got cut off by a lost delivery truck, so I had to go up to the next light and make another u turn. This time I turned the bars full lock left, let out the clutch, and again the bike came around amazingly well despite its weight. My friend rode it right after me but wasn’t as impressed. He’s more of a sport bike guy, which is fine. There’s a butt for every seat.

Ultimately, I’m really impressed with the new Venture Transcontinental. Yamaha did a great job engineering this motorcycle in my opinion. Great handling, comfort, looks (to me), storage, power in Sport mode, brakes, Raspberry metallic paint, warranty, and technology (standard and Transcontinental package). Engine heat, although felt while riding, would not be a deal breaker either. It was around 94 degrees, and was no worse than any other air/oil cooled v twin I’ve ridden. It was actually cooler that a stock Indian 111.

While I’m aware of some of the previous gen Venture rider’s issues with this bike (namely no V4) and I get it, you really have to ride this bike before ruling it out. Would I have preferred a liquid cooled V4? Probably, if it didn’t compromise the excellent handling, but the 1300 is no slouch. And to those who think air/oil cooled v twins don’t last, there’s a guy on an Indian forum with a 2014 that has around 250,000 miles with only a couple of minor issues, none of which were engine related. Several others with over 100,000, and that’s not including all of the Victory riders with that or more. I’m sure there are plenty of HD riders who could make the same claim.

My only complaints, and they wouldn’t stop me from buying it, are these:
1. The stereo sound quality. It could have been the radio station they put it on (didn’t have my phone plugged in) and the stereo settings, but I was expecting more clarity and better volume with the Transcontinental package. The Indian really shines here.

2. The frequent maintenance intervals on some items (oil changes every 6 months/4,000 miles, plugs every year, valve adjustments required, etc). To me some of these are a little excessive, and I’m still scratching my head at valve adjustments on a pushrod v twin.

Again, neither of these would keep me from buying it, but I had to mention them In fairness and to not sound like a Yamaha employee trying to boost sales on a forum:surprise:

I look forward to learning more about the new Venture Transcontinental as I get closer to making a decision. I had three Yamaha dirt bikes growing up and a 760 Waverunner in the late nineties, and they were good to me. it may be time to have a new Yamaha street bike. Until today my heart and mind were set on the Indian, but there’s apparently a new sheriff in town. Thanks Yamaha, I think?:grin:

Travis
 

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Hey Venture/Eluder riders, I joined over the weekend and tried to post my test ride impressions of the new Venture Transcontinental, but somehow missed the fact that I had to post in the New Member area first before it would let me post here...duh on my part. Now that I’ve been certified that I’m not Spam, a robot, or a Spambot, let the fun begin!

I joined this forum as it seems more active for the new bike, which is good. Below is what I intended to post on Saturday, I hope it helps anyone on the fence.

Greetings Venture riders,
I’m 49 years old, my wife, kids and I live in Colorado Springs, and I’m currently riding my beloved Honda ST1300 I bought new in 2003. Other than having to replace the fuel pump last summer, it has been really reliable, but I’ve been wanting a touring bike with more comfort. Below is a quick list of what I tried before the Venture Transcontinental:

1. 2017 HD Ultra Limited- Liked the new motor, good handling, great paint and chrome, but I felt cramped (5’10 with long legs), the suspension still needs more travel, and the tranny to primary fluid transfer issue concerned me. It may be resolved now as I haven’t followed their forums in a while.

2. 2018 BMW K1600 GTL- Great handling and brakes, smooth motor, good storage, but felt cramped again, the torque comes on too high in the RPM range for my liking, and the valve adjustments are expensive. I know there are highway pegs available and the Grand America has “footrest plates,” but still not really my cup of tea. Would love to have a new R1200 GSA LC to go with a new touring bike, though:wink:

3. 2018 Goldwing Tour (ST on steroids)- Lighter, more comfortable than previous gens (for me, especially with highway pegs), new motor is good, 6 speed manual and power windshield (finally), but less fuel capacity (more efficient but range stays the same), less storage, and not impressed with the new suspension. Felt numb up front and a little harsh on the rear, but it’s probably rider preference. Some like it, while others are going with a Traxxion upgrade. I would have to upgrade if I bought one.

4. 2017 Indian Roadmaster- My favorite until today. Great handling, styling (to me), paint and chrome, good brakes, comfortable for me (especially with highway pegs), great stereo and nav system, easy to maintain, but heat can be an issue. This is mitigated with new headers, exhaust and tune, but yes, it’s more money to do that. It does help though. I rode a Chieftain with their 116 upgrade kit (right before the stop sale) and Freedom headers/True duals, and I never felt any heat on a warm day. It went like stink for a bike in this category, too!:grin:

Then I got a chance to ride a new Raspberry metallic Venture Transcontinental demo in Denver last Saturday. I’ve liked the looks of this bike since it came out. The front (love the headlights), back, and side profile are very destinctive. It’s different in a good way, and sets it apart from the crowd. It’s also forging its own styling, and not trying to be something else.

The dealer let me go alone and where ever I wanted, so I took the same 14 mile route the Indian demo rides go on to compare the ride to the Roadmaster. Right off the bat I was impressed with the slow speed stability, and was blown away with how easy it made a tight u turn with little counterweight necessary. The power in Touring mode was decent and about what the Indian is, but Sport mode woke it up nicely. The pick up was stronger, and I never hit the rev limiter in first or second like some have complained. I found myself naturally shifting before it, even when accelerating hard. The torque sweet spot is much lower, anyway. I think some of those riders aren’t familiar with how to ride a v twin, and the Indian and HD redlines aren’t too far from there either.

Let me say that I’m not expecting this bike to be a drag racer, but I’m of the mindset that more power is better than less, especially when passing or avoiding distracted drivers. It also helps when riding at altitude in the Rockies.

On my way back to the dealership I got cut off by a lost delivery truck, so I had to go up to the next light and make another u turn. This time I turned the bars full lock left, let out the clutch, and again the bike came around amazingly well despite its weight. My friend rode it right after me but wasn’t as impressed. He’s more of a sport bike guy, which is fine. There’s a butt for every seat.

Ultimately, I’m really impressed with the new Venture Transcontinental. Yamaha did a great job engineering this motorcycle in my opinion. Great handling, comfort, looks (to me), storage, power in Sport mode, brakes, Raspberry metallic paint, warranty, and technology (standard and Transcontinental package). Engine heat, although felt while riding, would not be a deal breaker either. It was around 94 degrees, and was no worse than any other air/oil cooled v twin I’ve ridden. It was actually cooler that a stock Indian 111.

While I’m aware of some of the previous gen Venture rider’s issues with this bike (namely no V4) and I get it, you really have to ride this bike before ruling it out. Would I have preferred a liquid cooled V4? Probably, if it didn’t compromise the excellent handling, but the 1300 is no slouch. And to those who think air/oil cooled v twins don’t last, there’s a guy on an Indian forum with a 2014 that has around 250,000 miles with only a couple of minor issues, none of which were engine related. Several others with over 100,000, and that’s not including all of the Victory riders with that or more. I’m sure there are plenty of HD riders who could make the same claim.

My only complaints, and they wouldn’t stop me from buying it, are these:
1. The stereo sound quality. It could have been the radio station they put it on (didn’t have my phone plugged in) and the stereo settings, but I was expecting more clarity and better volume with the Transcontinental package. The Indian really shines here.

2. The frequent maintenance intervals on some items (oil changes every 6 months/4,000 miles, plugs every year, valve adjustments required, etc). To me some of these are a little excessive, and I’m still scratching my head at valve adjustments on a pushrod v twin.

Again, neither of these would keep me from buying it, but I had to mention them In fairness and to not sound like a Yamaha employee trying to boost sales on a forum:surprise:

I look forward to learning more about the new Venture Transcontinental as I get closer to making a decision. I had three Yamaha dirt bikes growing up and a 760 Waverunner in the late nineties, and they were good to me. it may be time to have a new Yamaha street bike. Until today my heart and mind were set on the Indian, but there’s apparently a new sheriff in town. Thanks Yamaha, I think?:grin:

Travis
Hi Travis,

The reason there is a recommendation interval for checking the valve clearance, is that Yamaha wants the owner and his/her mechanic to have a way to be absolutely sure that all four valves of the intake and exhaust side are '0' clearance. Having one side with a tappet adjuster available, allows you to do that, and not cross your fingers that the hydraulic factor of the lifters will guarantee that. Yamaha overkill? For we owners....we say thank you! :)

I traded a perfectly working, and running 2008 Honda GL1800 Premium Sound/Nav model...for my 2018 Star Venture T.C. Regret's with over 5,000 miles upon her? None whatsoever, Travis. That speaks more in the ear, than metrics and published data. Welcome to the board, and perhaps, to the Owner's Fold.

Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi Travis,

The reason there is a recommendation interval for checking the valve clearance, is that Yamaha wants the owner and his/her mechanic to have a way to be absolutely sure that all four valves of the intake and exhaust side are '0' clearance. Having one side with a tappet adjuster available, allows you to do that, and not cross your fingers that the hydraulic factor of the lifters will guarantee that. Yamaha overkill? For we owners....we say thank you! :)

I traded a perfectly working, and running 2008 Honda GL1800 Premium Sound/Nav model...for my 2018 Star Venture T.C. Regret's with over 5,000 miles upon her? None whatsoever, Travis. That speaks more in the ear, than metrics and published data. Welcome to the board, and perhaps, to the Owner's Fold.

Joe
Thanks for the clarification on their reasoning, Joe.
 

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Hey Venture/Eluder riders, I joined over the weekend and tried to post my test ride impressions of the new Venture Transcontinental, but somehow missed the fact that I had to post in the New Member area first before it would let me post here...duh on my part. Now that I’ve been certified that I’m not Spam, a robot, or a Spambot, let the fun begin!

I joined this forum as it seems more active for the new bike, which is good. Below is what I intended to post on Saturday, I hope it helps anyone on the fence.

Greetings Venture riders,
I’m 49 years old, my wife, kids and I live in Colorado Springs, and I’m currently riding my beloved Honda ST1300 I bought new in 2003. Other than having to replace the fuel pump last summer, it has been really reliable, but I’ve been wanting a touring bike with more comfort. Below is a quick list of what I tried before the Venture Transcontinental:

1. 2017 HD Ultra Limited- Liked the new motor, good handling, great paint and chrome, but I felt cramped (5’10 with long legs), the suspension still needs more travel, and the tranny to primary fluid transfer issue concerned me. It may be resolved now as I haven’t followed their forums in a while.

2. 2018 BMW K1600 GTL- Great handling and brakes, smooth motor, good storage, but felt cramped again, the torque comes on too high in the RPM range for my liking, and the valve adjustments are expensive. I know there are highway pegs available and the Grand America has “footrest plates,” but still not really my cup of tea. Would love to have a new R1200 GSA LC to go with a new touring bike, though:wink:

3. 2018 Goldwing Tour (ST on steroids)- Lighter, more comfortable than previous gens (for me, especially with highway pegs), new motor is good, 6 speed manual and power windshield (finally), but less fuel capacity (more efficient but range stays the same), less storage, and not impressed with the new suspension. Felt numb up front and a little harsh on the rear, but it’s probably rider preference. Some like it, while others are going with a Traxxion upgrade. I would have to upgrade if I bought one.

4. 2017 Indian Roadmaster- My favorite until today. Great handling, styling (to me), paint and chrome, good brakes, comfortable for me (especially with highway pegs), great stereo and nav system, easy to maintain, but heat can be an issue. This is mitigated with new headers, exhaust and tune, but yes, it’s more money to do that. It does help though. I rode a Chieftain with their 116 upgrade kit (right before the stop sale) and Freedom headers/True duals, and I never felt any heat on a warm day. It went like stink for a bike in this category, too!:grin:

Then I got a chance to ride a new Raspberry metallic Venture Transcontinental demo in Denver last Saturday. I’ve liked the looks of this bike since it came out. The front (love the headlights), back, and side profile are very destinctive. It’s different in a good way, and sets it apart from the crowd. It’s also forging its own styling, and not trying to be something else.

The dealer let me go alone and where ever I wanted, so I took the same 14 mile route the Indian demo rides go on to compare the ride to the Roadmaster. Right off the bat I was impressed with the slow speed stability, and was blown away with how easy it made a tight u turn with little counterweight necessary. The power in Touring mode was decent and about what the Indian is, but Sport mode woke it up nicely. The pick up was stronger, and I never hit the rev limiter in first or second like some have complained. I found myself naturally shifting before it, even when accelerating hard. The torque sweet spot is much lower, anyway. I think some of those riders aren’t familiar with how to ride a v twin, and the Indian and HD redlines aren’t too far from there either.

Let me say that I’m not expecting this bike to be a drag racer, but I’m of the mindset that more power is better than less, especially when passing or avoiding distracted drivers. It also helps when riding at altitude in the Rockies.

On my way back to the dealership I got cut off by a lost delivery truck, so I had to go up to the next light and make another u turn. This time I turned the bars full lock left, let out the clutch, and again the bike came around amazingly well despite its weight. My friend rode it right after me but wasn’t as impressed. He’s more of a sport bike guy, which is fine. There’s a butt for every seat.

Ultimately, I’m really impressed with the new Venture Transcontinental. Yamaha did a great job engineering this motorcycle in my opinion. Great handling, comfort, looks (to me), storage, power in Sport mode, brakes, Raspberry metallic paint, warranty, and technology (standard and Transcontinental package). Engine heat, although felt while riding, would not be a deal breaker either. It was around 94 degrees, and was no worse than any other air/oil cooled v twin I’ve ridden. It was actually cooler that a stock Indian 111.

While I’m aware of some of the previous gen Venture rider’s issues with this bike (namely no V4) and I get it, you really have to ride this bike before ruling it out. Would I have preferred a liquid cooled V4? Probably, if it didn’t compromise the excellent handling, but the 1300 is no slouch. And to those who think air/oil cooled v twins don’t last, there’s a guy on an Indian forum with a 2014 that has around 250,000 miles with only a couple of minor issues, none of which were engine related. Several others with over 100,000, and that’s not including all of the Victory riders with that or more. I’m sure there are plenty of HD riders who could make the same claim.

My only complaints, and they wouldn’t stop me from buying it, are these:
1. The stereo sound quality. It could have been the radio station they put it on (didn’t have my phone plugged in) and the stereo settings, but I was expecting more clarity and better volume with the Transcontinental package. The Indian really shines here.

2. The frequent maintenance intervals on some items (oil changes every 6 months/4,000 miles, plugs every year, valve adjustments required, etc). To me some of these are a little excessive, and I’m still scratching my head at valve adjustments on a pushrod v twin.

Again, neither of these would keep me from buying it.

Travis
I did some digging on the 113 CI (1854 cc) engine that Yamaha has used for some time. While Yamaha has done some redesign this this engine, adding a sixth gear moving the drive output from the left side to the right side, the basic engine design is still the same and has a proven reliability record. I found one owner of the previous 113 CI (1854 cc) engine who did not check the valves until he had 50,000 miles on his and the valves were still in adjustment.

I don't believe valves are going to be an issue on these engines from previous track record of prior versions of this engine.

As for oil changes, 4,000 miles is not so bad, Harley Davidson, Indian and Victory before they were closed down by Polaris all have 5,000 mile oil change intervals for the engines. Harley Davidson uses separate sumps for the engine, transmission and primary. Harley says to change the primary fluid every 10,000 miles but with all the metal shavings that the primary puts out I never went past 5,000 miles for the primary. The transmissions Harley says to change the fluid every 15,000 miles, that one you could follow without issue as long as you used a quality transmission oil. I changed mine at 5,000 miles any way.

I am sending oil samples to Blackstone labs so I will know how the oil is holding up, I will be sending my first sample using Redline 10w-40 motorcycle oil at the 8,000 mile service. It will take about three oil changes to get a good read on the oil as this one will by just under 3,000 miles but all the rest will be the full 4,000 miles. So by 16,000 miles I am betting that the lab reports will show you can go much further on the oil without worry once the warranty is up.

Spark plugs, the problem with spark plugs is motorcycle OEM's are still using the cheapest spark plugs made unlike car manufactures who are using higher quality spark plugs that will go between 80,000 to 120,000 miles depending on the manufacture brand of vehicle. Both my Honda and my Ram 2500 have 100,000 mile spark plug intervals.

I am changing to Iridium tipped spark plugs at the 8,000 mile service, Iridium tipped spark plugs are easier on the ignition coils, people are under the misconception that Iridium tipped spark plugs are only for performance engines but that is not the case, there are many benefits to an Iridium tipped spark plug, one being they produce a better spark long term because Iridium is a harder material that does not get worn down like copper core tips do. When a copper core tipped plug starts to wear the edges of the electrode making them rounded it can take unto 40% more power from the ignition coil to fire the spark plug.

Iridium tipped plugs cure that problem. They also will last longer than a copper core/tipped spark plug. You should be able to run an Iridium tipped spark plug in these engines for at least 32,000 miles before they might need replacement.

I enjoy doing maintenance to my motorcycle, it also allows you to stay in touch with how everything is wearing. To me that is a huge advantage over having a dealer do all the service, I have found motorcycle dealers don't employ the best techs for the most part. To many are young and inexperienced, plus no one will take better care of your vehicle than you will. You are vested in it, the young guy at the dealer has no vested interest in your vehicle, it is just another job to them.
 

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Hey Venture/Eluder riders, I joined over the weekend and tried to post my test ride impressions of the new Venture Transcontinental, but somehow missed the fact that I had to post in the New Member area first before it would let me post here...duh on my part. Now that I’ve been certified that I’m not Spam, a robot, or a Spambot, let the fun begin!

I joined this forum as it seems more active for the new bike, which is good. Below is what I intended to post on Saturday, I hope it helps anyone on the fence.

Greetings Venture riders,
I’m 49 years old, my wife, kids and I live in Colorado Springs, and I’m currently riding my beloved Honda ST1300 I bought new in 2003. Other than having to replace the fuel pump last summer, it has been really reliable, but I’ve been wanting a touring bike with more comfort. Below is a quick list of what I tried before the Venture Transcontinental:

1. 2017 HD Ultra Limited- Liked the new motor, good handling, great paint and chrome, but I felt cramped (5’10 with long legs), the suspension still needs more travel, and the tranny to primary fluid transfer issue concerned me. It may be resolved now as I haven’t followed their forums in a while.

2. 2018 BMW K1600 GTL- Great handling and brakes, smooth motor, good storage, but felt cramped again, the torque comes on too high in the RPM range for my liking, and the valve adjustments are expensive. I know there are highway pegs available and the Grand America has “footrest plates,” but still not really my cup of tea. Would love to have a new R1200 GSA LC to go with a new touring bike, though/forums/images/StarbikeForums_2015/smilies/tango_face_wink.png

3. 2018 Goldwing Tour (ST on steroids)- Lighter, more comfortable than previous gens (for me, especially with highway pegs), new motor is good, 6 speed manual and power windshield (finally), but less fuel capacity (more efficient but range stays the same), less storage, and not impressed with the new suspension. Felt numb up front and a little harsh on the rear, but it’s probably rider preference. Some like it, while others are going with a Traxxion upgrade. I would have to upgrade if I bought one.

4. 2017 Indian Roadmaster- My favorite until today. Great handling, styling (to me), paint and chrome, good brakes, comfortable for me (especially with highway pegs), great stereo and nav system, easy to maintain, but heat can be an issue. This is mitigated with new headers, exhaust and tune, but yes, it’s more money to do that. It does help though. I rode a Chieftain with their 116 upgrade kit (right before the stop sale) and Freedom headers/True duals, and I never felt any heat on a warm day. It went like stink for a bike in this category, too!/forums/images/StarbikeForums_2015/smilies/tango_face_grin.png

Then I got a chance to ride a new Raspberry metallic Venture Transcontinental demo in Denver last Saturday. I’ve liked the looks of this bike since it came out. The front (love the headlights), back, and side profile are very destinctive. It’s different in a good way, and sets it apart from the crowd. It’s also forging its own styling, and not trying to be something else.

The dealer let me go alone and where ever I wanted, so I took the same 14 mile route the Indian demo rides go on to compare the ride to the Roadmaster. Right off the bat I was impressed with the slow speed stability, and was blown away with how easy it made a tight u turn with little counterweight necessary. The power in Touring mode was decent and about what the Indian is, but Sport mode woke it up nicely. The pick up was stronger, and I never hit the rev limiter in first or second like some have complained. I found myself naturally shifting before it, even when accelerating hard. The torque sweet spot is much lower, anyway. I think some of those riders aren’t familiar with how to ride a v twin, and the Indian and HD redlines aren’t too far from there either.

Let me say that I’m not expecting this bike to be a drag racer, but I’m of the mindset that more power is better than less, especially when passing or avoiding distracted drivers. It also helps when riding at altitude in the Rockies.

On my way back to the dealership I got cut off by a lost delivery truck, so I had to go up to the next light and make another u turn. This time I turned the bars full lock left, let out the clutch, and again the bike came around amazingly well despite its weight. My friend rode it right after me but wasn’t as impressed. He’s more of a sport bike guy, which is fine. There’s a butt for every seat.

Ultimately, I’m really impressed with the new Venture Transcontinental. Yamaha did a great job engineering this motorcycle in my opinion. Great handling, comfort, looks (to me), storage, power in Sport mode, brakes, Raspberry metallic paint, warranty, and technology (standard and Transcontinental package). Engine heat, although felt while riding, would not be a deal breaker either. It was around 94 degrees, and was no worse than any other air/oil cooled v twin I’ve ridden. It was actually cooler that a stock Indian 111.

While I’m aware of some of the previous gen Venture rider’s issues with this bike (namely no V4) and I get it, you really have to ride this bike before ruling it out. Would I have preferred a liquid cooled V4? Probably, if it didn’t compromise the excellent handling, but the 1300 is no slouch. And to those who think air/oil cooled v twins don’t last, there’s a guy on an Indian forum with a 2014 that has around 250,000 miles with only a couple of minor issues, none of which were engine related. Several others with over 100,000, and that’s not including all of the Victory riders with that or more. I’m sure there are plenty of HD riders who could make the same claim.

My only complaints, and they wouldn’t stop me from buying it, are these:
1. The stereo sound quality. It could have been the radio station they put it on (didn’t have my phone plugged in) and the stereo settings, but I was expecting more clarity and better volume with the Transcontinental package. The Indian really shines here.

2. The frequent maintenance intervals on some items (oil changes every 6 months/4,000 miles, plugs every year, valve adjustments required, etc). To me some of these are a little excessive, and I’m still scratching my head at valve adjustments on a pushrod v twin.

Again, neither of these would keep me from buying it.

Travis
I enjoy doing maintenance to my motorcycle, it also allows you to stay in touch with how everything is wearing. To me that is a huge advantage over having a dealer do all the service, I have found motorcycle dealers don't employ the best techs for the most part. To many are young and inexperienced, plus no one will take better care of your vehicle than you will. You are vested in it, the young guy at the dealer has no vested interest in your vehicle, it is just another job to them.
I understand your reasoning on the “Technician” given your experiences this far. I however am on a different spectrum in that arena. My dealership ONLY allows their most experienced and proficient tech to work on my bike. I’ve spoken to him a number of times personally as we’ve discussed different things regarding the bike. He’s the one that I speak with after any service to get the report on anything done or needing to be done. He knows my background as well, so some things he knows I’ll do and that I know what I’m doing. I’ve develooed a great relationship with him which puts service on a different level. He’s even said he’d like to get one himself and LOVES these bikes!
That being said, it doesn’t mean I’m going to have them do everything maintenance wise on my bike by any means. It does however add a great peace of mind that IF I have to leave my bike for service, I know it’s in great hands by someone who is both competent and conscientious.

If you’re ever in Charlotte, NC area and have need of ANY service, I highly recommend Team Charlotte Motorsports!
Everybody from sales to service including the owner Bill Shenk are TOP NOTCH!
Their on line service reviews are not just “fluff” but are WELL deserved.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
I did some digging on the 113 CI (1854 cc) engine that Yamaha has used for some time. While Yamaha has done some redesign this this engine, adding a sixth gear moving the drive output from the left side to the right side, the basic engine design is still the same and has a proven reliability record. I found one owner of the previous 113 CI (1854 cc) engine who did not check the valves until he had 50,000 miles on his and the valves were still in adjustment.

I don't believe valves are going to be an issue on these engines from previous track record of prior versions of this engine.

As for oil changes, 4,000 miles is not so bad, Harley Davidson, Indian and Victory before they were closed down by Polaris all have 5,000 mile oil change intervals for the engines. Harley Davidson uses separate sumps for the engine, transmission and primary. Harley says to change the primary fluid every 10,000 miles but with all the metal shavings that the primary puts out I never went past 5,000 miles for the primary. The transmissions Harley says to change the fluid every 15,000 miles, that one you could follow without issue as long as you used a quality transmission oil. I changed mine at 5,000 miles any way.

I am sending oil samples to Blackstone labs so I will know how the oil is holding up, I will be sending my first sample using Redline 10w-40 motorcycle oil at the 8,000 mile service. It will take about three oil changes to get a good read on the oil as this one will by just under 3,000 miles but all the rest will be the full 4,000 miles. So by 16,000 miles I am betting that the lab reports will show you can go much further on the oil without worry once the warranty is up.

Spark plugs, the problem with spark plugs is motorcycle OEM's are still using the cheapest spark plugs made unlike car manufactures who are using higher quality spark plugs that will go between 80,000 to 120,000 miles depending on the manufacture brand of vehicle. Both my Honda and my Ram 2500 have 100,000 mile spark plug intervals.

I am changing to Iridium tipped spark plugs at the 8,000 mile service, Iridium tipped spark plugs are easier on the ignition coils, people are under the misconception that Iridium tipped spark plugs are only for performance engines but that is not the case, there are many benefits to an Iridium tipped spark plug, one being they produce a better spark long term because Iridium is a harder material that does not get worn down like copper core tips do. When a copper core tipped plug starts to wear the edges of the electrode making them rounded it can take unto 40% more power from the ignition coil to fire the spark plug.

Iridium tipped plugs cure that problem. They also will last longer than a copper core/tipped spark plug. You should be able to run an Iridium tipped spark plug in these engines for at least 32,000 miles before they might need replacement.

I enjoy doing maintenance to my motorcycle, it also allows you to stay in touch with how everything is wearing. To me that is a huge advantage over having a dealer do all the service, I have found motorcycle dealers don't employ the best techs for the most part. To many are young and inexperienced, plus no one will take better care of your vehicle than you will. You are vested in it, the young guy at the dealer has no vested interest in your vehicle, it is just another job to them.
Thanks American, some good points here. I agree that the valve adjustments aren’t going to be an issue, and many might forgo them for a while. Routine maintenance is important to me, so I will be doing them at the recommended intervals if I buy the SVTC. I still had them checked on my ST1300 at the Honda-recommended 16,000 mile mark despite the dealer telling me to wait and many other owners on ST forums waiting anywhere from 30,000-70,000 miles. I like to take care of my stuff (like you), it gives me peace of mind, and removes the chance for a warranty denial if something valve related should happen.

I also agree that 4,000 miles is not bad (or excessive) for oil change intervals, seems like the 2010 and older Victorys were at 2,500. I was referring to the 6 month requirement, which again I will abide by for the reasons mentioned above. Also, well maintained vehicles last longer and sell/trade in easier, especially if they still look good (my experience).

To me, Yamaha is the most reliable motorcycle brand made right now, so honestly I’m not really worried about anything mechanical with the SVTC, despite all that’s new with it. I have a "pro-Honda” friend that looks at me dumbfounded every time I say that. Truth is anything mechanical and man made can break, but I believe it happens the least with this brand, which is another draw for me to the SVTC. Could issues turn up as people get more miles on them? Sure, but Yamaha also felt confident enough to cover the bike for 5 years total, and manufactures want to avoid warranty claims whenever possible as it’s an expense that affects the bottom line. This 5 year coverage is another in the SVTC win column for me.

The long term reliability of the technology is a little more concerning though as I tend to hang on to things for a long time, but this is the case with most things made these days. My new fridge is so advanced, I’m pretty sure I can reprogram Russian satellites with it, way to go Whirlpool.

Interesting info on the Iridium plugs, I look forward to hearing you report back after you switch to them. I remember reading a detailed post by you about this, and it made sense.

I’m getting financially close to being able to pull the trigger on my new ride, and the SVTC is looking better all the time. Yes, it’s expensive (I want the Transcontinental pkg too), but so is everything else in this category. To me, it’s the best value when you look at everything you get for your money versus the competition. If I go the Indian route, not only is the entry price more, but I will end up doing some upgrades that will add to that. It is what it is, though. Such is the life of a motorcyclist.

Travis
 

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Discussion Starter #8
You're quite welcome! Hope you join the fold. Jamaha, it's hand's down a really great bike, and two bikes in one....Sport as well as Grand Tour. Take to the twisties ten miles from your home, or 3,000 miles away. The bike lets you make that choice an easy one.....

Joe
True Joe, it did good in the twisties. I only ground the floorboards a couple of times, but it never disrupted the bike’s stability. For me this bike was as fun to ride really slow as it was to ride at speed. Can’t say that about most heavy touring bikes.


Travis
 

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I understand your reasoning on the “Technician” given your experiences this far. I however am on a different spectrum in that arena. My dealership ONLY allows their most experienced and proficient tech to work on my bike. I’ve spoken to him a number of times personally as we’ve discussed different things regarding the bike. He’s the one that I speak with after any service to get the report on anything done or needing to be done. He knows my background as well, so some things he knows I’ll do and that I know what I’m doing. I’ve develooed a great relationship with him which puts service on a different level. He’s even said he’d like to get one himself and LOVES these bikes!
That being said, it doesn’t mean I’m going to have them do everything maintenance wise on my bike by any means. It does however add a great peace of mind that IF I have to leave my bike for service, I know it’s in great hands by someone who is both competent and conscientious.

If you’re ever in Charlotte, NC area and have need of ANY service, I highly recommend Team Charlotte Motorsports!
Everybody from sales to service including the owner Bill Shenk are TOP NOTCH!
Their on line service reviews are not just “fluff” but are WELL deserved.
You’re a lucky man, ChiefGunner. My experience overall has been more like American’s. Good mechanics can be hard to find, and I always request them when I can find ‘em. A simple oil change seems like rocket science for some mechanics. I’m certainly no pro, so if I can do it without leaving the drain bolt loose, oil all over the place, and the proper amount of oil added...........
 

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I understand your reasoning on the “Technician” given your experiences this far. I however am on a different spectrum in that arena. My dealership ONLY allows their most experienced and proficient tech to work on my bike. I’ve spoken to him a number of times personally as we’ve discussed different things regarding the bike. He’s the one that I speak with after any service to get the report on anything done or needing to be done. He knows my background as well, so some things he knows I’ll do and that I know what I’m doing. I’ve develooed a great relationship with him which puts service on a different level. He’s even said he’d like to get one himself and LOVES these bikes!
That being said, it doesn’t mean I’m going to have them do everything maintenance wise on my bike by any means. It does however add a great peace of mind that IF I have to leave my bike for service, I know it’s in great hands by someone who is both competent and conscientious.

If you’re ever in Charlotte, NC area and have need of ANY service, I highly recommend Team Charlotte Motorsports!
Everybody from sales to service including the owner Bill Shenk are TOP NOTCH!
Their on line service reviews are not just “fluff” but are WELL deserved.
You’re a lucky man, ChiefGunner. My experience overall has been more like American’s. Good mechanics can be hard to find, and I always request them when I can find ‘em. A simple oil change seems like rocket science for some mechanics. I’m certainly no pro, so if I can do it without leaving the drain bolt loose, oil all over the place, and the proper amount of oil added...........
I count myself very blessed Jamaha. I’ve had my share of bad experiences too which is why I’m so willing to sing the praises of a dealership that deserves it.
 
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