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Discussion Starter #1
Why does the v star 1300 need to down shifted so often while my venture just motors up the hills with no problem. My brain keeps telljng me a v twin with the same diplacement as my v4 should have more power but it does not.

Any recomencations for how or what to check first.
 

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Why would you think it would have more HP? A quick google search shows the Venture at about 97 HP and the V Star at about 69. Though it's about 100 lbs less, the V Star 1300 just doesn't put out a lot of HP.....30 less than the Venture.

You're comparing apples to oranges.....
 

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The V Star as OEM is also severely choked and has the AFR of a blow torch.

Jack's O2 Mod cures the AFR problem responsible for much of the "lugging", bucking, and hesitation under 20% throttle.

Drilling the intake cures most of the choked problem.

Total cost can be as little as pennies for a DIY job (as cheap as it can be the resister can be attached inline with the white wire on the O2 sensor). Both mods and details can be found at http://vstar1300.pbworks.com/w/page/5760692/FrontPage .

If you're willing and able to spend money on the problem, The Cobra CVT, slip-on, and performance intake of your choice will set you back around a grand.

It's not unusual to experience just over 15 HP increase from the second choice but the first choice will get you more than half way there. The choked intake is by far the worst offender. The intake hole is between the cylinders on the back side of the jock strap and barely big enough to fit a finger into. Skeptical? Remove the jock strap cover, tape the filter down and go for a ride.
 

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The V Star as OEM is also severely choked and has the AFR of a blow torch.

Jack's O2 Mod cures the AFR problem responsible for much of the "lugging", bucking, and hesitation under 20% throttle.

Drilling the intake cures most of the choked problem.

Total cost can be as little as pennies for a DIY job (as cheap as it can be the resister can be attached inline with the white wire on the O2 sensor). Both mods and details can be found at http://vstar1300.pbworks.com/w/page/5760692/FrontPage .

If you're willing and able to spend money on the problem, The Cobra CVT, slip-on, and performance intake of your choice will set you back around a grand.

It's not unusual to experience just over 15 HP increase from the second choice but the first choice will get you more than half way there. The choked intake is by far the worst offender. The intake hole is between the cylinders on the back side of the jock strap and barely big enough to fit a finger into. Skeptical? Remove the jock strap cover, tape the filter down and go for a ride.
FWIW, My vs1100 has k&n pod filters & cobra pipes and still is no barn-burner. Definitely 'downshift to go uphill' is still the order of the day.

Yes, that's a carbed 1100 vs. your 1300. But I think the point is simply that the VS cruisers were and are known for not making a lot of HP out of their displacement.

OTOH, the vstar motors are known for doing a lotta miles without having to be opened up, and maybe "not pushing 'em that hard" to eke out every drop of HP is part of the reason?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
thanks for the input guys. I know the thing does not have the HP of the Venture but I thought it might have more torque. I suspect it does not and may never. I tried the removal of the air intake cover and did not notice a lot of difference but I will look into a new cover or drilling out this one. The O2 sensor mod sounds simple enough. I will look into that. As far as changing out the exhaust, I really would need to hear and ride one before I would consider that. I have grown to appreciate a quite bike as much as I like loud ones. I check out the link. Thanks so much. That is what I was looking for. Once again the forum are the best thing to happen to motorcycling in a long time.
 

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It's important to note that the hp gains from modifying the intake are in the upper rpm range when the stock box just chokes. Most modest riding doesn't get into the range that will benefit. To "feel" it is more like noticing the engine not flattening out prematurely.

OTOH, the O2 Mod does affect the lower range (0-20% throttle), but only after the bike warms up and starts using O2 sensor input. Things like hesitation, stalling on takeoff, certain pops, inappropriate chugging and what not related to running a bright blue flame are mostly mitigated.
 

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I just moved from a 950 to a 1300 and it is a different animal altogether. Learning the bike is a big part of getting in the right gear at the right time. I'm still learning how long I can dwell in a gear before shifting. I do know that the top end speed is much higher on the 1300. I've gone faster in fourth gear than I ever did in fifth on the 950.

As far as torque goes, here are my thoughts. When I bought my Kubota tractor I could have gotten a three cylinder diesel or a four cylinder diesel in the same power category but, the four cylinder had more torque then the three cylinder. I would guess the same applies to motorcycles. Augie
 

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Yes, that's a carbed 1100 vs. your 1300. But I think the point is simply that the VS cruisers were and are known for not making a lot of HP out of their displacement.
FWIW.....No V twin is going to have High HP in relation to the displacement. Look at the Street Glide for instance....103 CI and only 76 HP. My "little" 600CC Ninja has almost double that. It's just the nature of the design. There is plenty of low end torque, but not much left over on the top end.

If you want to go fast up hills, a V Twin is not the answer.
 

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RPM vs. RPM Suzuki's SV650 (a non-racing standard w/a V-Twin) has as much output as a Ninja ZX-6R. The Ninja shines because it keeps going after 9000 rpms all the way to 13,500. The limitation is not that the Suzuki is a V Twin.

The limitation as it relates to the OPs comment is that it's 4 cylinders vs 2 in the same displacement range. It is much easier to engineer for the higher rpm range if you start with rods and bearings that carry lower inertial forces. The 1300 really isn't a slouch. But, it does need to be opened up to realize what a great engine it really has. The leanness causes low rpms to complain and the small suck hole makes it asthmatic in the upper range. Let the thing fart and it's a nice, well rounded engine for its intended purpose, which does not include racing.
 

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Let the thing fart and it's a nice, well rounded engine for its intended purpose, which does not include racing.
There are some videos on YouTube of 1300's doing ~12 sec. quarter mile runs. You are right..... open it up and it will run much better. I put intake, slip on, and fuelpak on mine and it really woke up!
 

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I've seen those videos. Drag racing is an unappreciated skill. I MIGHT be able to turn 13.7 on the same bike.
 

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RPM vs. RPM Suzuki's SV650 (a non-racing standard w/a V-Twin) has as much output as a Ninja ZX-6R. The Ninja shines because it keeps going after 9000 rpms all the way to 13,500. The limitation is not that the Suzuki is a V Twin.
Agreed...there are a couple production V twins that don't do too bad, but they are few and far between and normally not seen in a cruiser platform. You hit the nail on the head...Normally a V twin just can't spin fast enough to make the big power on the top end of an oversquare motor.

The later Buell's had just over 100 HP and were definitely nothing to scoff at. But it's really a sport bike like the SV650 so not really set up to be a long haul cruiser.
 

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I was thinking about this thread earlier and was reminded of an old John Deere tractor my dad restored compared to a Mustang GT I had. The tractor was a '49 D two cylinder that was 302 cubic inches. It could pull stumps at 500 rpm, and top speed was 4mph. It was a serious torque monster! The Mustang had a built up 302 motor. It would haul arse like nobody's business.....I could even get rubber at 30 mph! Man I loved that car! But if you swapped motors in these two machines, even though they were the same cubic inches, they both would have fallen flat on their faces. Different motors built for different purposes. The 1300 falls in between. It borrows technology from old school v-twins with the single pin crank v-twin, and from sport bikes with the ceramic lined cylinders and short stroke crank. I guess the best way to put it is that it is a spirited v-twin :)
 

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I was thinking about this thread earlier and was reminded of an old John Deere tractor my dad restored compared to a Mustang GT I had. The tractor was a '49 D two cylinder that was 302 cubic inches. It could pull stumps at 500 rpm, and top speed was 4mph. It was a serious torque monster! The Mustang had a built up 302 motor. It would haul arse like nobody's business.....I could even get rubber at 30 mph! Man I loved that car! But if you swapped motors in these two machines, even though they were the same cubic inches, they both would have fallen flat on their faces. Different motors built for different purposes. The 1300 falls in between. It borrows technology from old school v-twins with the single pin crank v-twin, and from sport bikes with the ceramic lined cylinders and short stroke crank. I guess the best way to put it is that it is a spirited v-twin :)
Very well put. Thanks :)
 

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The 1300 falls in between. It borrows technology from old school v-twins with the single pin crank v-twin, and from sport bikes with the ceramic lined cylinders and short stroke crank. I guess the best way to put it is that it is a spirited v-twin :)
Just like the 650, 950 and 1100.... all hi-rev v twins with ceramic coated cylinders. That's the way Yamaha like them it seems...and why it's fairly easy to get 150,000 out of them.
 

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Not sure I understand this. I live and ride in Western North Carolina and it is rare that I have to downshift to go up a hill. Only if I am running at a slow enough speed that I can't make the curve before going up hill do I have to down shift.
 

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My father has a mid 90s liquid-cooled Honda Pacific Coast 800 twin. We raced a few times on the empty Lake Ontario State Parkway. 0-60 mph, my 1100 would get him by about a half a bike length. After 60, forget it. I was toast. He would pull away from me like I was standing still. The 1100 is slow after 60 mph. Look at the performance stats: 0-60 mph in about 6 seconds, but a leisurely 15.0 seconds to 1/4 mile at 85 mph, which is close to top speed. I still get ribbed about it, nearly a year later. He loves to rub it in that an 800 twin was so much faster than an air-cooled 1100 at higher speed. Somehow, my 1100 did manage to break 100 mph. Took forever to get the needle past the high beam indicator.
 

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I liken the comparison of motorcycles to hammers. Hammers come in different designs and different weights for very different purposes, claw, ball peen, sledge, tack, pull...etc. So it is with motorcycles.

A V Star 1300 is designed by Yamaha to be a a cruiser-light touring motorcycle rather than a performance motorcycle. Doesn't mean folks can't increase performance, just means the stock configuration isn't designed to be a high performance motorcycle. It is very well designed for its purpose, IMHO.
 

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My father has a mid 90s liquid-cooled Honda Pacific Coast 800 twin. We raced a few times on the empty Lake Ontario State Parkway. 0-60 mph, my 1100 would get him by about a half a bike length. After 60, forget it. I was toast. He would pull away from me like I was standing still. The 1100 is slow after 60 mph. Look at the performance stats: 0-60 mph in about 6 seconds, but a leisurely 15.0 seconds to 1/4 mile at 85 mph, which is close to top speed. I still get ribbed about it, nearly a year later. He loves to rub it in that an 800 twin was so much faster than an air-cooled 1100 at higher speed. Somehow, my 1100 did manage to break 100 mph. Took forever to get the needle past the high beam indicator.
LOL....I do 90+ in 4th gear with my 1100 with pods and exhaust. Still plenty of room before the rev limiter too. It's not a neck breaker for sure, but topping 85 is a piece of cake. I generally cruise at 80-85 on the freeway for hours on end.
 
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