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My apologies if it's been posted, I did search but came up with no solutions. I bought my 2014 250 back in november and after the first ride my right mirror vibrated loose. I hand tightened it but now I can't get it to loosen again to readjust the mirror. To be clear, I'm referring specifically to the bolt where the mirror attaches to the bars. I'm afraid of stripping the chrome off of it if I try to be too forceful with a wrench. Can anyone help? In fact, can anyone clarify which direction I should be turning it to loosen? Thanks so much!

Josh Weinstein
NJ
 

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Josh, there may have been some humidity that got on the threads of the mirror post causing some corrosion. The casting this goes into is made of aluminum and the bolt is steel. Just apply a bit of penetrating oil and let it work for a bit. Then loosen the mirror. If you still feel that it's to tight, use a hairdryer and heat the casting.
 

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My apologies if it's been posted, I did search but came up with no solutions. I bought my 2014 250 back in november and after the first ride my right mirror vibrated loose. I hand tightened it but now I can't get it to loosen again to readjust the mirror. To be clear, I'm referring specifically to the bolt where the mirror attaches to the bars. I'm afraid of stripping the chrome off of it if I try to be too forceful with a wrench. Can anyone help? In fact, can anyone clarify which direction I should be turning it to loosen? Thanks so much!

Josh Weinstein
NJ
Hey Josh, I recently got a 2016 V Star 250 and the mirror vibrated loose after a few miles. I tightened it, but it came loose again after a few trips. Have you found a way to keep the mirrors in place? Just tighten them very tight? I don’t want to strip the threads.
 

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Medium strength loctite works very good. A little goes a long way. With the medium strength you can take it apart if needed.

 

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Forcedtoride, how do you like your 250 v-star? I saw a 250 Rebel about 3 years ago and it looked great. I've got a 650 V-Star but got sick and missed out on riding it before winter. I like smaller sized motors on motorcycles. In my opinion, if the bike is comfortable and can handle highway speeds, it can carry a rider anywhere. I see no reason why a 1800 cc engine would be more fun. I bought the very low mileage 650 because of the great price. I was looking for a Virago because I find them comfortable for my size. The 650 seems to be just as comfortable.
 

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Corsair: Having left handed threads on the left side mirror would actually make sense, because the wind load would tend to tighten the mirror up instead of making it loose. Im pretty sure they did not do that.
 

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...how do you like your 250 v-star? I saw a 250 Rebel about 3 years ago and it looked great. I've got a 650 V-Star .... I was looking for a Virago because I find them comfortable for my size. The 650 seems to be just as comfortable.
The Vstar 250 was the Virago 250 or some other name for a while when the Vstar line first came out. The Vstar 650 has pretty much the same engine as the Virago 650 - its an evolution from one model line to the next.

The 250 has a chain drive and a couple other things that were stepped up on the 650 (shaft drive, tire size...)

When I took the MSF beginners class we rode Rebel 250s, they are decent bikes for riding around town and commuting.

The 650 hits a pretty sweet spot, its good for commuting edging out about 60mpg with a stock engine if you dont ride it like a wild man all the time. It has enough HP to put a windshield and saddle bags on the bike, and still be able to cruise at 70mph and hit 80mph+ if you need to.

I wondered why Yamaha discontinued the VS 650 last year, its a very popular bike, they run forever. I think the reason is a lot of people get a 650 and are happy with it and never step up to a bigger bike. I can imagine 20 executives sitting around a big conference table in a board room having this discussion: "its the perfect mid size cruiser bike, people buy them and ride them for 20 years... so we have to stop making them!"

Ive had mine for 5 years, and Im thinking of getting a bigger bike for taking longer road trips. On the 650 Im good for a couple hundred miles a day, on a 3 day weekend - but to take on a 1500 mile road trip, or to take off for a week or more, I think I want a VS 1300, Roadstar 1600 or 1700, or maybe even something more aerodynamic like the FJR1300 sport touring bike.

A bigger bike is the difference between riding being possible, and being enjoyable. If you take a Roadstar out on a long trip you will definitely be more comfortable, the bike will be more stable, and you will enjoy the ride more.
 

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Thanks for the info KCW. I did a lot of riding when I was in my twenties. It was my only mode of transportation until I was about 25 years old. I'm deathly afraid of dropping my bike and not being able to get it up again. Long trips will be few but short trips to go fishing will be often. Where I live, just about every stream or lake is full of brook trout. I'm going to buy a 4 piece rod and I already have a small tent and camping gear. My 650 has saddle bags and windshield.
 

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I think we can cure your fear of dropping your bike right here.

The very first thing they teach you in the MSF beginners class is how to get on your bike and get back off without dropping it. Why? Because you are riding their bikes, and this is when you are most likely to drop it.

Stand on the left side of the bike, grab the right grip and pull the front brake on good. Swing your leg over and sit down while grabbing the left grip. Lift the bike up off its kickstand, then with your right foot planted push the kickstand up with your left foot, then plant your left foot.

When you get off the bike do the same things in reverse. Put the kickstand down, grab the front brake, lean the bike over onto the kickstand, swing your leg off, twist the handlebars all the way to the left, and let go of the grip/brake.

Everytime you get on and off your bike do it exactly the same way. After a few weeks it will become automatic, and if you get distracted and do something different it will stand out immediately. A huge benefit is: Everytime you get on the bike the kickstand goes up, and everytime you get off the kickstand goes down. You will never ride off with your kickstand down. And whenever you are sitting on the bike and it is stopped you keep the front brake on - always. With both feet down and the front brake locked you have a 3 point tripod that is keeping the bike from moving in any direction. If you release the front brake the bike can start rolling and you have to play catch-up with your feet.

This seems so obvious and so simple, but each step is there to keep you from dropping your bike.

IF you try to lift the bike off the stand before you are sitting on it, if you lean it too far to the right it will get away from you. Once it is past 90 degrees all your body weight is on the left side and you can not stop it from falling over to the right.

If you get off your bike without putting the kickstand down first, then you have to stand on one foot and balance the bike while you try to put the kickstand down with the other foot. This is THE MOST common way people drop their bikes.

The next most common way to drop it is to stand next to it and try to push it in the garage or up the driveway. Sit on the bike and duck walk it. If you have to push it up a hill start it up and slip the clutch and duck walk it. You can get away with pushing around a 200lb dirt bike, but a 500 lb cruiser will get away from you before you know what happened.

Another good way to drop your bike is to try and do a U turn going up or down a hill. When you are halfway thru the U turn, if you try to put your foot down on the downhill side of the bike, your bike is going down. This is one of the things you can do in a car that you cannot do on a motorcycle - if you have to turn around keep going until you get to a level stretch of road. And don't stop your bike any place where the pavement is sloping to the left or right. If you have to stop on a hill, point the bike up or down the hill first. This includes stopping the bike on a steep shoulder - DONT do it.

The other most common problem is doing slow speed turns and circles and figure 8s. When you take the road test you cannot put your feet down, but there is no reason why you cannot drag your foot or put both feet down when you are riding. You wont get a ticket. Practice riding slow when you stop and there are no cars behind you. Slow down about 30 to 50 feet short and then creep up at 2 or 3mph to the stop line. If you do this all the time you will quickly become good at riding slow. But no matter what, if you feel a bit off duck walk the bike, slip the clutch to go slow.

Dropping your motorcycle is the equivalent of rolling your car: there is no reason to do either, ever.

The most likely time for someone to drop a motorcycle is the worse possible time: when you have a brand new motorcycle. People get so emotional and overwhelmed the first time they ride a new bike, that is when they are most likely to forget to put the kickstand down, and jump off, or try to lift it up before they sit down. Brand new MC, 3 miles on the odo, dent in the gas tank, bent handlebars, broken turnsignals and mirror.

Should also point out something that most people do not understand. Many people are afraid of motorcycles because they do not know that, once you get going faster than 10mph, a motorcycle is self balancing. When you are riding along at 30 or 60 mph you are not balancing the bike, you are only steering it. If you locked the throttle and jumped off the bike it will keep going without you till it hits something, or it runs out of gas. The gyroscopic force of the spinning wheels and tires is so powerful that the only way to make a motorcycle fall over while it is moving at normal speeds, is to lock up both brakes.

So.. don't ever do that either. Its ok to lock up just the back wheel in a panic stop, but if you start skidding the back wheel don't let off the brake till the bike comes to a stop, or the bike will snap back straight and throw you right off the bike. Don't ever lock up the front brake - all that self balancing power stops instantly, and its like god himself reached down and slapped your bike to the pavement.

If you have in inherent fear of dropping your bike while you are riding it, get the bike up to speed and just hold your hands loose on the grips - see for yourself that the bike may not keep going perfectly straight, but it will not fall over.
 
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