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Sad news, indeed. The article said he failed to negotiate a curve.

Happened to me in 1982. I failed to look through a curve, went straight ahead (the direction I was looking) off the road and over the handlebars. (I panicked and locked the front wheel.) Fortunately, there was no on-coming traffic or guard rail. Lesson learned.
 

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There were two that died here this week. 62 yr old had a DUI driver turn in front of him and an 18yr. No details on the younger but police were looking for two sports cars that apparently had something to do with the accident. So tragic and unnecessary. Be safe and on your guard out there.
 

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2000 Yamaha XVS1100a Classic
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224 Posts
I just wonder how we could avoid such an ending.
1) Presume everybody is trying to kill you on the road and ride accordingly.
2) Get to know your own limits and stay within them.

These two things will help a lot but it can still happen. Just enjoy the ride and don't dwell on it.
 

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2000 Yamaha XVS1100a Classic
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224 Posts
Yep. You have to ride like a paranoid chihuahua!
...except for the peeing on the floor thing when you hear a loud noise. Don't do that. 😁
 

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I just wonder how we could avoid such an ending.
Here are at least four ways:

1. Educate yourself and improve your riding skills. Take a course in advanced motorcycle skills. I’ve ridden with riders who have had a bike for so long but couldn’t negotiate speed through a sweeping curve. They know how to twist the throttle and squeeze the brake but are lost on the true dynamics of handling the motorcycle when things go awry. If you can‘t take off from a standing start with your wheel turned and execute a short radius U-turn with your 900 lb. bike then you are under-skilled.

2. Make sure your bike is in as good as condition as possible. Proper maintenance, brakes, tires and tire inflation can go a long way towards saving your life.

3. If you enjoy the ownership of a classic bike then that’s great but don’t make it your mainstay. Buy an updated bike with fresh technology. If your bike doesn’t have at least ABS you are way behind the times. Computer assisted traction control and cornering ABS are becoming standard on many bikes these days and will help to save your ass when your skills fall short.

4. Have plenty of lighting on your bike. It’s been proven that a difference in color, a small set of bright yellow lensed auxiliary or fog lights cause drivers to look longer at you and contribute that much more to being seen and recognized. 90% of fatal accidents happen from impacts in a 70 degree window from the front of the bike.

Have fun and ride safe.
 

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1) Presume everybody is trying to kill you on the road and ride accordingly.
2) Get to know your own limits and stay within them.
Slight variation I was taught by my high school driver's ed teachers.
  • Assume no one sees you - your bike is small and easily missed in the "blind spot" and even when they look right at you.
  • Always be watching and give yourself a buffer in case of stupidity.
  • Always be in control. Not just your's but your bike's as well. Know what it can and can't do and respect it.
  • Always be aware of road conditions - greasy from rain, covered with leftover winter sand, leaves, possible critters.
  • Driving a vehicle is a gamble and you can only do so much to avoid a nasty surprise. On a motorcycle, the outcomes are often skewed in favor of the surprise. Gamble only what you can afford to lose.
 

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We have had a couple people killed on bikes here in Michigan already this year. I hate to hear about it any time of the year but is the hardest at the beginning of the season. Ride safe everyone!
 

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I live in the city of 280,000 and we've lost four so far since the middle of March, lost one yesterday while I was out riding. Three out of four were cars turning in front of them as they rode probably just a little too fast.
 

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2007 VStar 1300
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604 Posts
Here are at least four ways:

1. Educate yourself and improve your riding skills. Take a course in advanced motorcycle skills. I’ve ridden with riders who have had a bike for so long but couldn’t negotiate speed through a sweeping curve. They know how to twist the throttle and squeeze the brake but are lost on the true dynamics of handling the motorcycle when things go awry. If you can‘t take off from a standing start with your wheel turned and execute a short radius U-turn with your 900 lb. bike then you are under-skilled.

2. Make sure your bike is in as good as condition as possible. Proper maintenance, brakes, tires and tire inflation can go a long way towards saving your life.

3. If you enjoy the ownership of a classic bike then that’s great but don’t make it your mainstay. Buy an updated bike with fresh technology. If your bike doesn’t have at least ABS you are way behind the times. Computer assisted traction control and cornering ABS are becoming standard on many bikes these days and will help to save your ass when your skills fall short.

4. Have plenty of lighting on your bike. It’s been proven that a difference in color, a small set of bright yellow lensed auxiliary or fog lights cause drivers to look longer at you and contribute that much more to being seen and recognized. 90% of fatal accidents happen from impacts in a 70 degree window from the front of the bike.

Have fun and ride safe.
Nice to see the focus / priority being the motorcycle operator. Too many riders blame the 'stupid cager' or 'that *bleeping soccer mom in that SUV', and totally ignore the fact that what happened was avoidable with minimal effort.

As part of the education MC operators need to learn how to think 3 or 4 steps ahead. Many cannot or do not because they don't understand the concept.
 

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Mid-Mi. here riding for 55 years and my 1st bike was a BSA 650. Every rider of every bike craves that one-with-the-bike feeling of accelerating through or out of those perfect curves with no traffic and on a good surface. TOO Few take the time to experience intentional hard braking while turning practice. The fear of laying-it-down causes some to not lean and ... too many sad, painful, and expensive outcomes.
 

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2001 VStar 650 Classic
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522 Posts
I always ride under the assumption that a car is going to turn in front of me.

Nothing wrong with taking an advanced Motorcycle Safety Training. Last year I took a Motor Officer training with the Los Angeles Police Department taught by the same trainer who trains the Officers. You can never be too safe.

As recommended by my instructors I practice ALL the time panic braking. I do this almost every time I ride, whether joy riding or commuting to work, on a street with hardly any traffic or empty parking lots. The Police Officers say that the skills we learned on the MSF are perishable, we have to practice those all the time. They do that every morning on their way out when patrolling.
 

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I always ride under the assumption that a car is going to turn in front of me.

Nothing wrong with taking an advanced Motorcycle Safety Training. Last year I took a Motor Officer training with the Los Angeles Police Department taught by the same trainer who trains the Officers. You can never be too safe.

As recommended by my instructors I practice ALL the time panic braking. I do this almost every time I ride, whether joy riding or commuting to work, on a street with hardly any traffic or empty parking lots. The Police Officers say that the skills we learned on the MSF are perishable, we have to practice those all the time. They do that every morning on their way out when patrolling.
This is a must.
My one drop and slide as a very new rider happened because I had no clue how to properly execute an emergency / panic stop. I got the panic part down...I was a natural at that. Throttle on and grabbing that front brake sure made for some fun. Since then I have made it a point to practice emergency stops. More so once I bumped up to my Vstar 1300 and started having my wife or daughter on the bike with me.

The one time I really, really needed this skill, my daughter was with me. We were approaching one of those wide intersections, two or three lanes each way with a small median in the middle. I cut my speed and checked my 6, (nothing back there). As we approached the light, it gave a slight flash of yellow, then turned red right when I hit that no man's land area when you have a split second to stop or go. No way I could make it across, so I emergency stopped. My daughter heard me yell "Hold on!", the back end chirped a little, and we stopped about a bike's length over the stop bar. The stopping was automatic because as soon as the light turned red all I was thinking about was having my daughter with me.
 

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I live in the city of 280,000 and we've lost four so far since the middle of March, lost one yesterday while I was out riding. Three out of four were cars turning in front of them as they rode probably just a little too fast.
Hello and welcome to the forum @DLR. Use the new member intro thread to tell us a little about yourself and your ride. Visit often and enjoy snooping around. Happy trails from NewYork.
 

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2012 V-Star 950
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50 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Very sad.

So, the motorcycle rider hit the oil slick and skidded. Not sure what was the cause of death. It says the motorcycle was on the street and another car hit it. The motorcycle rider was found later. He must have gone flying. I still don't understand how he ended up that way.
 
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