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2008 V Star 1300 Tourer
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Well that sucks. If it were me, I wouldn't screw with trying to glue it.

I've done many of these on car and trailer tires, but not on a bike. A car tire you can break the bead on one side and pull out the old stem and put in a new one without dismounting the tire. There might be a chance you could on a bike as well. I'd even try it while on the bike with a worse case having to remove the wheel. But not sure what your comfort level is here so you'll have to decide how to proceed.
At first it seems counter intuitive to attempt to fix a stem, we all know that. The reason that came to mind is that the stem is in tact (or it appears) and it's in place, just not a perfect fit in the whole. i don't think (at this point) that it would suddenly burst or have any kind of fast release of air. The reason i think this is my seeing it first hand. Its sorta like what bpounds said earlier about the rear stem being an odd size, ever so slightly off, in other words the diameter of the section that goes through the wheel was never quite wide enough from the time it was installed. It fit and all. Think of a stem laying on its side on a table, it's shaped like an H at the end,,the part that goes through the wheel, what you see as the horizontal part of the H isn't quite wide enough. With sideways force applied to the stem (guessing 20+ degrees) exposes this condition. Its tight but just not tight enough.

I will look at it later and further evaluate it, it would be nice if i could finish out using these tires.

Anyway, that's why i thought of a thin layer of silicone "fishtank glue" under the top part of the stem seal, applied with a hobby paint brush (small), almost just painted on. I'd mask off the area tilt the stem and smear a little. Not try to structurally hold anything together, but to provide additional sealing qualities. You won't even see it there, that little of silicone.

This makes me wonder about the OEM Yamaha Stems for this bike, there maybe reason they cost $20.00+ vs $4.00, maybe they're slightly "Odd" size, like bpounds said. I wish he'd tell us how he found that out, his experience that led to that conclusion.
 

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2008 Yamaha Road Star Silverado (Gray, hard bags, etc.)
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1,100 Posts
@VStarArizona I get where you're coming from now. Typically in the stem issues I had were due to age and cracking. Most notably it would be in the center of the "H" as you describe it. Usually only had an effect if you pushed once certain direction but not the other.

In the car, truck, trailer world I'm more familiar there are only two sizes of valve stems. The smaller .453 rim hole (most common) and then the larger .625 typically found on implement wheels where tubes are common.

Here's what Revzilla has regarding stems:
What size valve stem do I need for my tubeless tire?
There are two types: 8 mm and 10 mm. The larger one, which actually fits an 11.3 mm hole in the wheel, is by far the most common size. It's used by all the Japanese manufacturers and Harley-Davidson. The smaller size, actually an 8.3 mm opening, is used by some BMWs and Buells and aftermarket wheels.

I wouldn't suspect Yamaha would deviate from any standard spec in this area. In my above scenario you can't put the smaller stem in the larger hole. At some point if you do replace the stem, wonder if these metal ones with the rubber washer would work any better?

 

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2008 V Star 1300 Tourer
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690 Posts
@VStarArizona I get where you're coming from now. Typically in the stem issues I had were due to age and cracking. Most notably it would be in the center of the "H" as you describe it. Usually only had an effect if you pushed once certain direction but not the other.

In the car, truck, trailer world I'm more familiar there are only two sizes of valve stems. The smaller .453 rim hole (most common) and then the larger .625 typically found on implement wheels where tubes are common.

Here's what Revzilla has regarding stems:
What size valve stem do I need for my tubeless tire?
There are two types: 8 mm and 10 mm. The larger one, which actually fits an 11.3 mm hole in the wheel, is by far the most common size. It's used by all the Japanese manufacturers and Harley-Davidson. The smaller size, actually an 8.3 mm opening, is used by some BMWs and Buells and aftermarket wheels.

I wouldn't suspect Yamaha would deviate from any standard spec in this area. In my above scenario you can't put the smaller stem in the larger hole. At some point if you do replace the stem, wonder if these metal ones with the rubber washer would work any better?

I was thinking of getting those, maybe not angled, but metal mechanical stems.

Based on what you said about sizes, i wonder if the part of the "H" that goes through the wheel is torn or worn from twisting...

Choices:
Get new Valve
Get new rear tire and valve
Get new front and rear tires and valves
Add air weekly and ride until tires are worn out 3-4k (after further inspection).
 

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2008 Yamaha Road Star Silverado (Gray, hard bags, etc.)
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Well in theory, if it's the correct size it should be tight enough it should never spin. When you install them, the tool usually pulls them hard enough to stretch making the top part of the "H" shrink to get through the hole. I usually use a little bead grease to make them slip in easier and to help prevent rust (on steel wheels).

I put those metal stems on my camper wheels when I replaced tires a couple years ago. Mainly because two of the wheels already had that style. Not sure why they were different. You see the metal ones more often in high pressure applications. My camper (and truck) run 70 PSI in the tires.
 

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2008 V Star 1300 Tourer
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690 Posts
Well in theory, if it's the correct size it should be tight enough it should never spin. When you install them, the tool usually pulls them hard enough to stretch making the top part of the "H" shrink to get through the hole. I usually use a little bead grease to make them slip in easier and to help prevent rust (on steel wheels).

I put those metal stems on my camper wheels when I replaced tires a couple years ago. Mainly because two of the wheels already had that style. Not sure why they were different. You see the metal ones more often in high pressure applications. My camper (and truck) run 70 PSI in the tires.
To be clear, it's loses about 2-3 lbs a week. and it has been for 1.5 years, likely more. Might have been the PO last straw after buying tires, sold the bike. Not real hip about throwing $600 at the bike right now. Taking it slow. Actually it loses less air than that, i've been checking air every 2-3 weeks. so its about 2.5 lbs a week.
 

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2005 V-Star 1100 Classic
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2008 V Star 1300 Tourer
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Tire valve stems - 1100 Classic wheels | Yamaha Starbike Forum (starbikeforums.com)

Above is a thread I started when I needed new stems. Definitely a different size between front and rear on the 1100. Can't say what other Yamaha models are.

Incidentally, 90° are the bomb. Would never go back to straight rubber stems.
I'll definitely look into that more, I will say the 1100 is a different bike without a lot of swappable parts. The 950 is more in its family than the 1100 which is Air cooled, carb, it goes on and on, different bikes. Are the Front Back stems the same OEM p/n on the 1100? They are on the 1300.
 

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2008 V Star 1300 Tourer
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Tire valve stems - 1100 Classic wheels | Yamaha Starbike Forum (starbikeforums.com)

Above is a thread I started when I needed new stems. Definitely a different size between front and rear on the 1100. Can't say what other Yamaha models are.

Incidentally, 90° are the bomb. Would never go back to straight rubber stems.
Definitely not rubber. Think i'm taking the day off, maybe i'll look at it again tomorrow and see. Check the air again. Video would be nice. Thanks, i am less concerned with Valve size now. Dealer felt confidant it wasn't an issue, if that means anything. Definitely metal, not rubber.
 

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i'll look at it closer tomorrow, thanks
After not riding for 3-4 days, i went out to check the air and it was 39 lbs psi in the rear at 6:30am. Could not replicate the hiss sound. Not sure what happened but it seems to be fine now, In the meantime i set-up a 6' long rubber hose (Goodyear) with a chuck attached directly to it (no quick release on the chuck side.) which will make it easier to add air in the future, compared to the coiled harder plastic cheap hose the try to coil-up on you and makes it difficult to add air. I won't have to "fight" it anymore. Took a ride up in the woods this morning. Now i have dedicated air line just for the bike with a quick release 6' away from the bike, straight shot at the valve with a straight and flexible rubber hose.

Tire Wheel Vehicle Automotive tire Car
 

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Registered
2008 V Star 1300 Tourer
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690 Posts
After not riding for 3-4 days, i went out to check the air and it was 39 lbs psi in the rear at 6:30am. Could not replicate the hiss sound. Not sure what happened but it seems to be fine now, In the meantime i set-up a 6' long rubber hose (Goodyear) with a chuck attached directly to it (no quick release on the chuck side.) which will make it easier to add air in the future, compared to the coiled harder plastic cheap hose the try to coil-up on you and makes it difficult to add air. I won't have to "fight" it anymore. Took a ride up in the woods this morning. Now i have dedicated air line just for the bike with a quick release 6' away from the bike, straight shot at the valve with a straight and flexible rubber hose.

View attachment 116915
Here's my new air hose for the bike, not a 90 degree chuck (didn't want to pay for one) but its close and with the rubber hose without obstruction (from a quick release or hose protector at end) should work. You can see the coiled hose i was using...
Font Audio equipment Wood Circle Wire

Light Automotive tire Gas Auto part Automotive wheel system
 

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Administrator - "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
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