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Discussion Starter #1
As a today's lesson to get used to my new bike, I went riding on a parking lot to practice upshifting and downshifting. My V star 250 is a cruiser style bike. I never rode one like it. My previous bike had a shifting lever more underneath me and it was easy to put my foot under the lever and upshift. This bike has the shift lever more towards the front, so in order to get my foot under it I have to "stretch" my foot forward. That's a new movement for my foot and it takes some time to do it right. So I was trying to come up with some more comfortable ways of doing the upshifting move. I could do it with the front of my boot, the boot sole forms kind of a V shaped "groove" which I could use to upshift. I could use the part of the boot that's above my big toe. I am used to have the shifting lever on the other side of the ball of the foot. That feels the most secure. So I was wondering what other people, especially with cruisers, do? Another way how to approach this could be replacing the shifting lever with a longer one, that might give me more space between the foot peg and the lever, so it would make it easier for me to upshift.

Thanks for any advices/opinions...
David
 

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At least one of the motorcycle magazine reviewers noticed the lack of space between the shift lever and the foot peg on the 250 Star. I usually wear safety toe boots when I ride, and getting the boot under the shift lever takes a little maneuvering. I have looked and I am not sure that adjusting the linkage to raise the lever would help much, but it might. At the moment the 250 Star is my only bike, and I guess I have adapted to it.
 

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On my 650 there is plenty of room between my boards and lever. I actually slide my foot passed the toes to upshift as this gives me a more supported movement. Quite embarrassing when I don't use enough pressure and move from first to neutral as I am pulling through an intersection.

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Movstar... I know what you mean by embarrassing. This 1100 is my first cruiser and first bike with floorboards and a heel toe shifter. I've done it several times where I'll move my left foot and my heel comes down on the shifter and I'm suddenly in neutral and going nowhere.

On a different note, the more I ride this bike the more comfortable and familiar it becomes. Won't be too long before everything becomes second nature and my old bike will seem odd to ride.
 

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I have the opposite problem with neutral and the heel shift on my 950. I always shift past neutral and find it hard to get into. Of course my big feet might have something to do with it.
 

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I could do it with the front of my boot, the boot sole forms kind of a V shaped "groove" which I could use to upshift.
I'm trying to be nice about this and make sure I am not missing something here but, doesn't that strike you, instantly, as inherently and unnecessarily risky?

I am trying to think of why anyone would not come to the conclusion, rather quickly, that the shifter is designed, for upshifts, for the top of your boot, for obvious reasons and, likewise, the bottom of your shoe for downs shifts.

Motorcycle controls are not the place to try and get creative. They need to be comfortable and easy to use.

Maybe you have a weird foot? Old ankle injury that makes shifting the bike in question challenging?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I'm trying to be nice about this and make sure I am not missing something here but, doesn't that strike you, instantly, as inherently and unnecessarily risky?



I am trying to think of why anyone would not come to the conclusion, rather quickly, that the shifter is designed, for upshifts, for the top of your boot, for obvious reasons and, likewise, the bottom of your shoe for downs shifts.



Motorcycle controls are not the place to try and get creative. They need to be comfortable and easy to use.



Maybe you have a weird foot? Old ankle injury that makes shifting the bike in question challenging?

I think I did express myself very clear. As I wrote, I had no problem upshifting with the top of my foot on my previous bike. My current one is a bit different, so I was not sure if I am doing the right thing since it felt a little weird.
This special case happened more or less by "accident" since I have not developed the muscle memory for the upshift on my V Star 250. I just listed it as a "finding" from my lesson, if you will.

Thanks everybody for their thoughts...
 

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I think I did express myself very clear. As I wrote, I had no problem upshifting with the top of my foot on my previous bike. My current one is a bit different, so I was not sure if I am doing the right thing since it felt a little weird.
This special case happened more or less by "accident" since I have not developed the muscle memory for the upshift on my V Star 250. I just listed it as a "finding" from my lesson, if you will.

Thanks everybody for their thoughts...
Just wanted to make sure I understood. For me, if my foot is in a 'forward control' position, like you describe, it is easier to flex up to shift. In a more neutral control position, as on an adventure bike, or a 'back' position, as on a sport bike, it's a little tougher to upshift because of the angle you're trying to reach with your foot/ankle joint.

I would think you will get used to it really quickly and actually find it easier. But, I would strongly argue against using the seam of your boot.

Cheers
 
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