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Discussion Starter #1
Big Bike Parts (Show Chrome) 61-120?
HitchDoc 15665 Black Trailer Hitch?
Rivco YSV007 hidden hitch?

I know this has been posted already. so now that some riders have one of these, I'm thinking about one now that riding 2 up.

Comments please!!
 

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Have to say it: Yamaha does not recommend pulling a trailer with any of their motorcycles.

Simply because this is a public forum I need to point out its a risky thing to do. (some riders are not aware)
 

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Big Bike Parts (Show Chrome) 61-120?
HitchDoc 15665 Black Trailer Hitch?
Rivco YSV007 hidden hitch?

I know this has been posted already. so now that some riders have one of these, I'm thinking about one now that riding 2 up.

Comments please!!
I went with the Big Bike Parts 61-120 hitch. It's very sturdy and was really easy to install. I don't recall how long it took, maybe 2 hours tops? That's not counting the wiring, which will be the same regardless of which hitch you choose. One potential downside to this hitch is that it's not a receiver hitch, so it's fully there & visible all the time. I personally don't consider this a negative, others might disagree. I just cover the hitch ball with a black rubber cover (Curt 21801, $4 on Amazon) and the whole thing just sorta blends in.

This past fall I traveled 2800+ miles riding 2-up & towing a Dart cargo trailer. Interstates, twisties, uphill, downhill, stop & go, zero issues. Most of the time I could barely even tell the trailer was back there. Just remember to crank up the pre-load on your rear suspension to account for the extra weight hanging on the back.

One other tip: If your trailer doesn't have a swivel hitch, add one. A standard ball & hitch has a limited amount of travel side-to-side. So as your bike leans into the corners the ball eventually reaches it's travel limit and you start applying torque to the bike's hitch & trailer's tongue. Not a good thing. Here's a great video showing a swivel hitch in action. You can buy one online for around $150 and they're easy to install.

With all that said: This is my first & only hitch, so I have no experience with any other set up to compare it to. All I can say is that I'm very happy with my set up, it performs great, and I've had zero issues. I hope the info helps and if you have follow-up questions, just ask! :)

-Tinker
 

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Hunter,
I went with Big Bike Parts (Show Chrome) 61-120. Only one available then.
I am happy with it. Towing Bushtec Turbo II trailer.
I can also recommend:
  • Wiring harness and isolator from Electrical Connection.
  • Trailer connectors from Bushtec. Flat 6 pin waterproof. Easy to mount on a flat piece of aluminum.
 

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Hunter,
I went with Big Bike Parts (Show Chrome) 61-120. Only one available then.
I am happy with it. Towing Bushtec Turbo II trailer.
I can also recommend:
  • Wiring harness and isolator from Electrical Connection.
  • Trailer connectors from Bushtec. Flat 6 pin waterproof. Easy to mount on a flat piece of aluminum.
Agree with you on the wiring harness from electrical connection.
@hunter6462 I went with the Hitch Dr. hitch. It’s design has better stronger connecting points to the frame and is a receiver hitch as well. Another item is that I went with the “pin style” like is used on Bushtec & Hannigan trailers. It has a lot better range of motion without binding.
That type of setup is already 360 degree swivel by virtual of the “heim joint” or “rod end” bearing used. Either way, having a swivel connection on your trailer is a MUST IMHO.
 

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I went with the Rivco as it's hidden with the ball mount removed. I do like to keep the bike looking clean. Plus, it's sturdy and well made. Elec. Connections made up the totally plug and play including putting on the 6 prong for a Bushtec. This is what I got from EC:

Sub-Harness. p/n 07693, $49.95
Isolator. p/n 07660, $79.95
Bushtec Bike Side Harness (not on site). $29.95

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Discussion Starter #7
I went with the Big Bike Parts 61-120 hitch. It's very sturdy and was really easy to install. I don't recall how long it took, maybe 2 hours tops? That's not counting the wiring, which will be the same regardless of which hitch you choose. One potential downside to this hitch is that it's not a receiver hitch, so it's fully there & visible all the time. I personally don't consider this a negative, others might disagree. I just cover the hitch ball with a black rubber cover (Curt 21801, $4 on Amazon) and the whole thing just sorta blends in.

This past fall I traveled 2800+ miles riding 2-up & towing a Dart cargo trailer. Interstates, twisties, uphill, downhill, stop & go, zero issues. Most of the time I could barely even tell the trailer was back there. Just remember to crank up the pre-load on your rear suspension to account for the extra weight hanging on the back.

One other tip: If your trailer doesn't have a swivel hitch, add one. A standard ball & hitch has a limited amount of travel side-to-side. So as your bike leans into the corners the ball eventually reaches it's travel limit and you start applying torque to the bike's hitch & trailer's tongue. Not a good thing. Here's a great video showing a swivel hitch in action. You can buy one online for around $150 and they're easy to install.

With all that said: This is my first & only hitch, so I have no experience with any other set up to compare it to. All I can say is that I'm very happy with my set up, it performs great, and I've had zero issues. I hope the info helps and if you have follow-up questions, just ask! :)

-Tinker
Have you seen these: Freedom Pivot Ball Trailer Hitch?
 

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Have you seen these: Freedom Pivot Ball Trailer Hitch?
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I had one of those. The whole ball would flop over to one side and stay there. It didn't return to pulling from straight up so my tongue receiver had to pull at an angle most of the time.

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Discussion Starter #9
I'm looking at a 25 year old Cycle Mate model CM2000 trailer that is said to be garage kept.Tires and bearings 2-1/2 years old.
Comments please!!
 

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I'm looking at a 25 year old Cycle Mate model CM2000 trailer that is said to be garage kept.Tires and bearings 2-1/2 years old.
Comments please!!
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New this basic model runs between $1,500.--2,200., or so. So for a fairly low price, one that age if it's in good shape, should work fine. It's not as classy as some of the better know trailers or other models of CM, but it depends on if class or money is more important. I'm not a fan of the 8" wheels, but again, it should work okay. It should have a swivel hitch and a spare tire.

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Discussion Starter #11
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New this basic model runs between $1,500.--2,200., or so. So for a fairly low price, one that age if it's in good shape, should work fine. It's not as classy as some of the better know trailers or other models of CM, but it depends on if class or money is more important. I'm not a fan of the 8" wheels, but again, it should work okay. It should have a swivel hitch and a spare tire.

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asking price $500
 

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Tires, bearings and cosmetic things can be fixed easily. Look at the welds, broken welds are the easiest way to make a trailer useless, unless you can weld. If the bones are good, then a good buy. I highlighted areas to pay attention to from online photos, hope it helps.

92251


92252
 

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I had one of those. The whole ball would flop over to one side and stay there. It didn't return to pulling from straight up so my tongue receiver had to pull at an angle most of the time.

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Well, that’s not acceptable. I’d seen those and wondered about that. You answered my question. 👍
 

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asking price $500
That’s not bad. I picked up my Hannigan trailer which is a loaded 2004 with 1,100 miles on it for $1700 but the trailer is worth $6,000. Mostly because it also has BRAKES in it.
92275


I will say you have to keep a closer eye on the trailers with smaller wheels as far as making sure you regularly repack the bearing with grease. Those little wheels have to spin 3 TIMES for every 1 that your bike wheel turns AND at a much higher speed to keep up. Just a thought.
 

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If it is easy to pick up, sounds like you can't lose. Heck, it costs me $500. in depreciation and repairs just to ride my bike for 1,000 miles!

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Cmon Ron, it’s not that bad! Don’t even try to tell me you’re not enjoying your SVTC!
 

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Cmon Ron, it’s not that bad! Don’t even try to tell me you’re not enjoying your SVTC!
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I have an Eluder and rode it about 18,000 miles last summer, but that doesn't mean it doesn't cost a lot. Figure that if the bike goes 100,000 miles in five years and costs $30,000., then you are paying $.30 per mile right there. Now add in cost of licence plate, insurance (which are factors of time--not mileage), and maintenance of $1,500. every 16,000 miles for swing arm, etc., work, plus any other repairs--another $.20 per mile. Then there's the cost of you're not having that 30K in stocks earning money coming in (harder to figure that). That's not including regular travel costs of $.10 per mile for premium gas. Tire replacement including labor, plus oil changes--adding another $.05-.10 per mile. You need to figure the whole ball of cost. Using my numbers, it's costing you approximately $.70 per mile.

Anyone who thinks having one of these bikes is cheap, doesn't understand finances too well or doesn't ride much.

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^ if you had $30k in stocks this year, you have $20k in stocks now

The "could have invested that money" logic doesnt always hold

if you want a motorbike, get a motorbike - the money is worthless if you dont spend it on one thing or the other
 

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I have an Eluder and rode it about 18,000 miles last summer, but that doesn't mean it doesn't cost a lot. Figure that if the bike goes 100,000 miles in five years and costs $30,000., then you are paying $.30 per mile right there. Now add in cost of licence plate, insurance (which are factors of time--not mileage), and maintenance of $1,500. every 16,000 miles for swing arm, etc., work, plus any other repairs--another $.20 per mile. Then there's the cost of you're not having that 30K in stocks earning money coming in (harder to figure that). That's not including regular travel costs of $.10 per mile for premium gas. Tire replacement including labor, plus oil changes--adding another $.05-.10 per mile. You need to figure the whole ball of cost. Using my numbers, it's costing you approximately $.70 per mile.

Anyone who thinks having one of these bikes is cheap, doesn't understand finances too well or doesn't ride much.

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My bad on the bike type. Many do much of the maintenance you mentioned to help keep costs down, and I realize each person has their own comfort level of maintenance they’re willing or capable of doing.
I’m not deceived on the true costs of operating a bike. Especially a full dress that’s high tech, which is why I “work it” whenever I can.
I think I use my bike for work about 35% of the actual time I ride it. It actually helps offset the costs by getting paid travel time to the sites. My company pays for the gas (business write off) and when I’m done I write the mileage off on my taxes (whatever the standard mileage deduction is).
Am I making enough to completely offset the costs of ownership? Heck no! Not even with including wages charged while working at a site, but is a lot less than would otherwise be. Besides, my work van only get. 27mpg while the bike gets about 43.
 
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