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Discussion Starter #1
Hey all...first, I've searched and didn't find the precise info I am looking for for my situation...so I apologize for "yet another windshield" thread.

I just bought a 2013 1300 V-Star Tourer in Feb and love it! I love the windshield...BUT, a couple nights ago I was riding home and it was as misty night. My windshield quickly became unable to see through and I found I was leaning my head around the side to safely see.

I am trying to find out my best option. I live in Newfoundland, which is known for high winds and extremely frequent occurrences of rain, drizzle and fog.

Is there a product that could be rubbed on to improve visibility at low speeds? If so, that would be my favored option.

If not, am I better off cutting the windshield lower, buying a shorter one, or simply removing it? If cutting, I would have to bring it in somewhere to have it done because I don't have the proper setup to attempt it myself.

Thanks!
 

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You're supposed to just be able look over the top of a motorcycle windshield, not through it. With the amount of bugs we around here in the summer, I couldn't imagine trying to see through the windshield. They can be cut down, but you are smart to take it to someone who has the proper tools. I got a couple of small cracks when I did it. But in the meantime, lemon Pledge will help bead the water. You can probably use rain-x, but I would check with the manufacturer first.

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Either your windshield is too tall, or you are too short. Or your wipers are not working correctly.

For as long as I can remember, the standard has always been to look over the windshield.
 

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Rain-x is not recommended for plexi-glass or lexan windshields.
 

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I have trimmed a couple of Plexifairing windshields. Not difficult, but it does take some care. Put masking or painters tape over both inside and outside of windshield, completely covering the plastic, for perhaps 4" or 10 cm down from the top. This is to prevent scratching. Use a ruler or equivalent to "transfer" the line of the top of the shield down whatever distance you think appropriate onto the tape. A Sharpie or equivalent works well. You will likely have to improvise a little as the windshield is usually a little wider at the transfer line. I used an electric saber saw to cut the shield along the transferred line. Go slowly, or the plastic will melt instead of cut. It is better to cut off too little, because you can always cut more off later. You should be able to just see over the windshield when seated normally on the bike. Finish the cut edge with any sort of abrasive (sandpaper) using a wood block to back the paper. The more care you take with the original saw cut, the less finishing you will have to do.
 

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Like everyone said, you should be looking over the wind screen not through it. But... shampoo works very well for things like that. When I played ice hockey we would use shampoo on the clear visors and they never fogged up.
 

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If you decide to cut your windshield down, once you have made your cut and are satisfied with the height, sand the edge nicely, then go practice with a torch on a scrap piece of material. You can make the edge look like a factory finish with just the right amount of heat. Just enough to start the melting process but not enough to melt it. Basically, the sanded edge will turn clear.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the suggestions...I'll try the lemon pledge first before getting it cut (may just buy a shorter one in case I'm not happy with it). A friend had his cut and wasn't happy.
 
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