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Discussion Starter #1
Hey guys. I'm about to start putting the front lights together again but thinking about leaving the silly little toggle switch that was on the passing lights out of the picture. All it did was turn them on. I left them on anyhow and would rather simplify things. Any reason not to do this?

And while I'm on the subject. Does anyone have a wiring diagram for the front light gear with passing lights? My Clymer manual doesn't show them.
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
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I always leave mine on to. Just never got around to bypassing the switch. Here's the wire colors.

104885
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I knew you'd have the answer. 🍺 😄

So should there be 2 blue wires or is that just a duplicate entry?
 

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It is a Blue wire with a split connector. the Black also is a split connector

Run a small lighting solenoid, run a fused hot form the battery to power the lights through the solenoid, use the Blue wire as the (+) for the solenoid and the Black for the (-) to turn the solenoid on and off
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
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Discussion Starter #6
Alright - you're talking about solenoids and there weren't any when I took it apart so I'm guessing you're mentioning them just in case I had something to install that needed them?
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
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Adding a relay (solenoid) reduces the amperage on the smaller wires from carrying the heavier load that leaving driving lights on all the time can produce. Is it necessary, no, but advised. I had a relay on mine, but I upped the wattage on the driving lights. If you have the stock 1100 driving lights they are 35 watt, 4449 bulbs. The 4449 bulb come in different wattage, I put in 50 watt bulbs. Made a huge difference in night time driving.
 
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If you change the bulbs to LED you wouldn't need a relay as you would lower the amperage of the lights , but increase the Lumens of light output, if you are using the regular bulbs I would suggest the relay.
 

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Ohm's Law, where it regards power.
W = watts
I= current
V = voltage

I=W/V
I=50/12
I=4.2 Amps

I=35/12
I=2.9 Amps

Current carrying capacity of 16 AWG 20 Amps
Current carrying capacity of 18 AWG 9.5 Amps
Current carrying capacity of 20 AWG 6.0 Amps

Its highly unlikely they used 20 gauge wire, more likely 18 or 16. I don't see the need for the solenoid, unless you want to spend more and increase opportunities for failure.

 
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There are also 5 other lights powered on the same circuit from a single fuse.
 

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Hey guys. I'm about to start putting the front lights together again but thinking about leaving the silly little toggle switch that was on the passing lights out of the picture. All it did was turn them on. I left them on anyhow and would rather simplify things. Any reason not to do this?

And while I'm on the subject. Does anyone have a wiring diagram for the front light gear with passing lights? My Clymer manual doesn't show them.
Sorry for interfere, but I have some questions:
1. if the passing lights will be permanently “ON”, the alternator and also the charging relay are capable to sustain this in order to provide the correct amount of “energy” for the battery to be always properly charged?
2. if the above condition is accomplished, does this new condition will affect the alternator for the next period considering that they are designed to work correctly at 70-80% of load for a specific period in time, and only for limited time to provide peaks of 100%? Translation: the alternator and/or the charging relay will not be affected/damaged earlier? From my point of view, if this will happen during a ride and you are at 50 miles far from home, it will be difficult to return only with the battery on and “drying”…
But perhaps you already considered these…if so, sorry for asking.
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
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Actually the point @Jspree and I were attempting to make from experience is extra lighting on a circuit with smaller wires will strain that circuit. I've rewired lights before onto one circuit only to melt wires, the smaller wire are not made to carry the extra load. A relay on it's own circuit with proper guage wire eliminates this issue. Just a heads up for those possibly thinking of tapping onto an existing circuit with wire guage rated to carry current load.
 
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I left the little toggle there. My old bike cranks alot before it will fire. I turn them off when starting. I use 45 watt amber lamps. May only be 8 amps but i figure let it go to the starter.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
If you change the bulbs to LED you wouldn't need a relay as you would lower the amperage of the lights , but increase the Lumens of light output, if you are using the regular bulbs I would suggest the relay.
But wouldn't that necessitate a change of the housing too?
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Looking at the solenoid - one for both passing lights or one each?
 

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Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
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Just one for both.
 
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There are also 5 other lights powered on the same circuit from a single fuse.
So then the problem becomes do I need to add another circuit. That single fuse will blow when its current limit is reached, it doesn't matter where/how the current is going after it leaves the fuse. Look at the fuse and you can get an idea of how much current a particular circuit can handle. The wires used within that circuit will always be designed to safely carry more current than what it requires to blow the fuse.

Actually the point @Jspree and I were attempting to make from experience is extra lighting on a circuit with smaller wires will strain that circuit. I've rewired lights before onto one circuit only to melt wires, the smaller wire are not made to carry the extra load. A relay on it's own circuit with proper guage wire eliminates this issue. Just a heads up for those possibly thinking of tapping onto an existing circuit with wire guage rated to carry current load.
If your wires are melting and not your fuse, then the fuse is to big. Its not that the wire wasn't big enough to carry the extra load, its the circuit was not designed for that size load.

This actually goes to the point I was trying to make. You are adding an additional circuit, which does not already exist on the bike, to carry an additional load, above and beyond what is originally there. I'm not saying this is wrong to do, it can be a good idea. But for someone that may not be familiar with electricity, you guys have presented it in a way which sounds as if you'll be connecting the relay within the current circuitry, which is not the case.

If you are adding additional circuitry, then you will be adding additional cost and introducing another "path" for failure. @Lup69 asks, what I think is a very valid question? Is the alternator large enough to handle the additional load.

To address both the additional load an additional circuitry question, I'll post this question. Does Yamaha offer passing lights as an option for the bike? If they do (which they do, you see them everywhere) then the alternator is capable of handling the load. (Are they going to sell an option which is going to cause problems for the bike that they will need to address? I doubt it.) The second part. Does the optional passing light kit come with a relay to wire in an additional circuit? If it doesn't, it would indicate that the engineering involved looked at this and decided it wasn't necessary.

But wouldn't that necessitate a change of the housing too?
Not necessarily. They are now making LED bulbs that replace the halogen. Some are a direct replacement, some are not. I've just replaced the high and low beam bulbs in the Stratorliner with LEDs. I've sourced, but haven't yet ordered LED bulbs for the passing lamps.

As @Jspree said, switch to LED. You'll get more light for less current. I'd speculate that if you replaced all the bulbs on that circuit with LEDs, you'll reduce the current draw below what was and leave you enough room for the new lights without additional current requirements.
 
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