Yamaha Starbike Forum banner
  • Hey everyone! Enter your ride HERE to be a part of this month's Bike of the Month Challenge!

21 - 40 of 69 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
Those might work. In one of the pictures, they show a wire coming out of the housing which plugs into an HB3 connector.

Using @lesblank specification of a 4449 bulb, which appears to have screw type connectors, I found these:

I don't know anymore than what the ad states. It does say that it has screw type connections for original fitment. It also says it puts out 2100 lumens whereas the ones you listed show an output of 1440 lumens.

You can use this to see a comparison in light output.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lorax

·
Registered
08 Road Star 1700
Joined
·
734 Posts
If I were going to bother putting in a relay it would be to control the passing lamps from the high, low headlight switch. My FLH they came on with the low beam, off on high.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
If I were going to bother putting in a relay it would be to control the passing lamps from the high, low headlight switch. My FLH they came on with the low beam, off on high.
It was that way on mine too. Harley offered a wire, which I added that disabled that, so the passing lights would stay on with both high and low beam. In the newer bikes, there is a computer controlled setting for that. Apparently, there is some law which mandates that function, personally I don't see the need. In my F-350, if I have the fog lights turned on, when switching to high beam, the fog lights will shut off.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lorax

·
Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
Joined
·
10,895 Posts
I will agree with most you wrote, except when adding a relay the actual power is from the battery. The existing fuse and circuit is only a switch to turn the power on.

104914
 

·
Registered
08 Road Star 1700
Joined
·
734 Posts
I will agree with most you wrote, except when adding a relay the actual power is from the battery. The existing fuse and circuit is only a switch to turn the power on.

View attachment 104914
It was that way on mine too. Harley offered a wire, which I added that disabled that, so the passing lights would stay on with both high and low beam. In the newer bikes, there is a computer controlled setting for that. Apparently, there is some law which mandates that function, personally I don't see the need. In my F-350, if I have the fog lights turned on, when switching to high beam, the fog lights will shut off.
My 63 Olds had one of the automatic headlight dimmers. Little thing that sat on the dash. It worked real good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
I will agree with most you wrote, except when adding a relay the actual power is from the battery. The existing fuse and circuit is only a switch to turn the power on.

View attachment 104914
Les, I really don't want to get down in the weeds on this. I think, at this point, you and I are wrapped up in semantics. In your diagram, without using the relay, 87 connects directly to 86 and the other connections wouldn't exist. Add in the relay and now 87 gets connected to 30, while 86 is used to make the connection happen. Coming off 30, is an added circuit, thus the note for an additional fuse. That also means another wire must be run from the battery (for this discussion I don't care about routing). So its more involved than the uninitiated would be led to believe.

There is nothing wrong with doing it the way you suggest. On the other hand, if you don't want the extra work/expense/aggravation, I'm suggesting you don't have to. Just don't exceed the capacity of the existing circuit (look at the size of the fuse which is already there).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lorax

·
Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
Joined
·
10,895 Posts
There are many different ways to accomplish the same thing. I use relays to control most add ons. Yes, its does involve running a fused wire to the battery, no big deal to me. I also solder all connections, necessary, no, but for long term it's the best, in my opinion. I'm also a fan of dialectic grease in all factory slip on connectors. I also color code all wiring. Red is always hot, black always ground, blue is always trigger. Most folks can follow behind me and easily identify what the wires are for. It's just a me thing that has worked for years without issues.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,981 Posts
Those lights you found on Amazon are a great deal, real bright low amps and you could run them without a relay as it would be lower amps and it will help on the life span of the stator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
Those lights you found on Amazon are a great deal, real bright low amps and you could run them without a relay as it would be lower amps and it will help on the life span of the stator.
I dunno? Can I say "I told you so."?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
460 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Now I'm curious to know if by using those LED bulbs, I'd blind the oncoming drivers. Maybe leaving the switch in place would be a good idea - or just have them on when I have high beam on. Puzzling this out as I decide what I want. Fun nonetheless. Thanks for all the help guys!
 

·
Registered
08 Road Star 1700
Joined
·
734 Posts
I forgot I had one rattle loose and fall off on a ride. I was glad the little toggle was there I could turn them off and not short out a wire that may rub bare until I got it secured again.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
Now I'm curious to know if by using those LED bulbs, I'd blind the oncoming drivers. Maybe leaving the switch in place would be a good idea - or just have them on when I have high beam on. Puzzling this out as I decide what I want. Fun nonetheless. Thanks for all the help guys!
This doesn't apply to the passing lights. One of the nice things about the direct replacement LED bulbs is (in most cases) that they maintain the same focal length as the original bulb. That keeps the same aiming point in the reflector so the angle should be the same as original. I haven't made enough trips at night on the Strat, just yet, but so far no one has complained (flashed their lights at me).

The passing lights. They are supposed to be aimed so they point slightly to the side and down to fill in the "light gap" underneath the head light. I'm thinking, that if you haven't changed the aim point of the passing light housing, you should be OK. If it were me, I'd keep the switch, if for nothing else, to stay legal. They are supposed to turn off with the high beam on. I don't know, does VT have a vehicle inspection; I know RI does. If you can't shut them off, will it pass inspection?

Last I knew, VT didn't have a whole lot of people in it (population around 400K). As such, fairly rural, like where I'm at now. I'd like to have as much light as possible when combating the critters along the roadside. So I would recommend (which is what I've done) is to use the most lumens I can get my hands on, which will fit.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lorax

·
Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
Joined
·
10,895 Posts
I'll second the aim of driving light a little to the side. I travel a stretch every morning in the dark with possums, raccoons, etc darting onto the road often. The first part of the video is with driving lights on riding this stretch and you can maybe see how they light the shoulder up.

 
  • Like
Reactions: bevo1981 and Lorax

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
460 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
@CantRider Yes, we have state inspections for motorcycles here - pretty basic. Nothing about passing lights that I'm aware of. If it has a headlight, working brakes and a brake light, you're good to go.

I'll test the lights after I get everything wired up. Should be able to finish the paint job this week and hopefully get the wiring done too. Just want to dbl check measurements on those lights and the cans.
 

·
Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
Joined
·
10,895 Posts
Good buy, but only 15w conventional bulb, won't be all that bright.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lorax

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
460 Posts
Discussion Starter #38
Good buy, but only 15w conventional bulb, won't be all that bright.
But they're 2000 lumens. The bulbs @CantRider found are 2100 lumens. 15W is just the power consumption so these should be almost as bright or did I miss something? Seriously fun. Haven't had to use my electrical education in decades!!
 

·
Super Moderator "Loose Nut" - Houston, Texas
2001 Vstar 1100 Classic (sold), 2006 HD Electra Glide Ultra Classic
Joined
·
10,895 Posts
You are correct, when I opened the Amazon link it took me to a bulb I had previously looked up. When I closed that tab and opened the one of yours it brought up the bulb you are talking about.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lorax

·
Registered
Joined
·
684 Posts
But they're 2000 lumens. The bulbs @CantRider found are 2100 lumens. 15W is just the power consumption so these should be almost as bright or did I miss something? Seriously fun. Haven't had to use my electrical education in decades!!
No, I don't think you missed a thing. That's the nice thing about the LED technology, they're so much more efficient. You can either get much more light for the same amount of power (watts) or the same amount of light for much less power.

I found this Watts to Lumens calculator. (I didn't study it or read the directions, you may want to do that before you trust it.) Watts to lumens (lm) conversion calculator

Real quickly plugging in the above numbers, 15W Halogen gives 300 lumens, 15W LED gives 1350 (there's an efficiency factor I didn't mess with and just took the default).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Lorax
21 - 40 of 69 Posts
Top